Food Art for Kids: Approaches to Making your Child Friendly with Fruit and Vegetables | No category

Food Art for Kids: Approaches to Making your Child Friendly with Fruit and Vegetables

By Friday, July 29, 2011 Permalink

by Jonell Galloway

Getting your kids to participate in the kitchen is often the hardest task of all, but if you want them to learn that all food doesn’t come out of packages and that food can even be fun, can be like playing or art class, they are much likelier to head for the kitchen. If they have fun, they’ll want to come back for more, and show off their art work to others.

Annabel Karmel on Parenting makes lots of healthy finger foods which make it seem so fun to eat, even though it’s actually a carrot stick or a pea that’s been used for decorating.

Summertime also lends itself to Food Play. Put a basket of multi-colored fruit on the table, and kids can be let wild to build sculptures, make houses, all in the name of edible fun. Or give your kids a chance to do the decorations for a lunch party by letting them create edible fruit bouquets.

First Palette gives loads of ideas for fun food crafts.

Free Kids Crafts also includes lots of fun food projects for children, but you might pick and choose as to which ones are healthier.

 

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Kids in the Kitchen: Daily Food Joke for Kids, July 29, 2011

By Friday, July 29, 2011 Permalink

What did the mother ghost tell the baby ghost when he ate too fast?

Stop goblin your food.

Courtesy of Cooking With Kids.

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French Food Quotes: Daily Food Quotes, July 28, 2011

By Thursday, July 28, 2011 Permalink

by curry

“…..an ignorant and pretentious bunch try to improve on what is already the finest….. The improviser sets himself up at the stove just as he does anywhere else. With his eyes turned to heaven instead of on his saucepans, he drops in a pinch of Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette powder here, a spoonful of brandy there, and somewhere else, something even worse — a few drops of custard! He uses any old stuffing, he dribbles in some frightful additive. . .. Old words, classic terms, and traditions are all flouted by these priests of improvisation — it seems that we are a long way removed from the discreet combinations of flavors, thought out at length, that were once the basis of French gourmandise. . . “.–Colette (Sidonie Gabrielle), French novelist, in Prisons et Paradis, 1933

Known as Colette, Sidonie-Gabrielle Colette, born into an upper middle class family, in France. She spent most of her childhood in Burgundy, and also maintained her taste for the freedom that country life lent. In Paris, she lived the Bohemian life and frequented the salons of the period. She started by writing for musical halls, signed by her first husband, and even showed up at the Moulin Rouge dressed as a man, but went on to journalism and literature. Her books remained in the spirit of music halls, often shocking the public with their explicit descriptions of sex and the senses.

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French Food Quotes: Daily Food Quote, July 26, 2011

By Wednesday, July 27, 2011 Permalink

by Jonell Galloway

This is my invariable advice to people: Learn how to cook — try new recipes, learn from your mistakes, be fearless, and above all have fun!–Julia Child

Julia Child brought French food to post-war America. When her husband Paul was posted to Paris, she studied at L’Ecole du Cordon Bleu, and went on to form her own cooking school with fellow students Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle. The threesome went on to write the 2-volume classic Mastering the Art of French Cooking, which covered all the basic techniques and dishes of classic French cuisine.

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Cross-Continental Cuisine / Cocina Transcontinental: Paté al cava y sangría de jengibre

By Tuesday, July 26, 2011 Permalink

por SandeeA y Tricia Martin

Click here to read English version

Pate al cava / Giger sangria
Me pasé toda la infancia soñando con probar la comida de la que hablaban en los libros… me parecía tan exótica y apetecible! Los emparedados, los pasteles de carne y manzana, la cerveza de jengibre de los libros de Enyd Blyton, … y quién no ha soñado con comerse uno (o dos) jabalíes con Astérix y Obélix… y ya puestos darles unos mamporros a esos “malditos romanos” y decirle al pescadero del pueblo galo que su pescado no está fresco para que se organice una buena :P?

Este mes el ingrediente elegido para nuestro Cross-Continental Cooking project fue el cava… y gracias a este proyecto conjunto que tengo con Tricia de Eating is Art voy a poder preparar mi propia cerveza de jengibre, simplemente mezclando sirope de jengibre con agua con gas… De los sueños gastronómicos infantiles ya solo me queda pendiente la pelea a besugazos (o pangazos, según como esté la economía :P) No dejéis de visitar la receta de Tricia: sangría de cava que, como todas las anteriores, está traducida al español. Además Tricia se ha embarcado en un nuevo proyecto: su propio estudio fotográfico Studio Tricia Martin. No dejéis de visitarlo, os dejará sin palabras… En cuanto a mi receta, tenéis que probarla, de verdad, y no volveréis a comprar uno de esos “blocs de foie” con ingredientes dudosos por los que te piden un riñón

Pate al cava / Ginger sangria

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David Downie: Guanciale: An Obituary and a Homage to Rome’s Jowl Bacon, Part 2

By Tuesday, July 26, 2011 Permalink

by David Downie

Click here to read Part 1

For centuries, Rome’s demand for cured hog jowl was met by hundreds of specialized pork butchers and salami makers. The first are called norcini and are both butchers and salted-pork product makers. The second, salumieri or salsamentari, do not usually get involved in the butchering of the pigs. Norcia, the mountain town in Umbria famed for its black truffles, gave its name to norcini, such as the Carilli brothers were: they came from the area. It has been the heartland of great pork and wild boar for millennia. Both animals feed on acorns from the forests that gave Umbria its name. (Umbre and variants originally meant “shady” or “dark,” as in a dark forest of oaks.)

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Restaurant Silvio Nickol im Hotel Relais & Châteaux Palais Coburg

By Tuesday, July 26, 2011 Permalink

by André Cis

Click here to read this article in English

Als logischen oder zumindest Konsequenten Schritt kann man Silvio Nickol‘s Wechsel vom Wörthersee in die Österreichische Hauptstadt nennen. Nachdem sich die Zeichen mehrten, dass das einstige Flaggschiff der mit Fanfahren ins Leben gerufenen “Capella-Hotelgruppe” im Sinken begriffen ist, war es nur eine Frage der Zeit, bis Nickol zu neuen Herden aufbrechen würde.

Palais Coburg. Eigner Peter Pühringer schien nach dem jähen Abgang des begnadeten österreichischen Paradekochs Christian Petz – just nach der Vergabe der 4. Haube im Herbst 2008 – keine Intention mehr zu haben, einen 2. Versuch ob eines Gourmet-Restaurants zu starten. Im Gegenteil, schien es doch gar ins Bild der so trüben Wirtschaftslage zu passen, dünnte sich in den vergangenen Jahren die Wiener Spitzengastronomie sukzessive aus – unlängst mit dem unerwarteten Paukenschlags der Nicht-Eröffnung des Shangri-La Hotels und dem somit arbeitslosen Spitzenkoch Joachim Gradwohl.

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Simon Eats: Simon de Swaan Eats his Way through Spain, a Documentary Photo Show, Part 1

By Monday, July 25, 2011 Permalink
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Silvio Nickol’s Restaurant in Palais Coburg Relais & Châteaux Hotel in Austria

By Monday, July 25, 2011 Permalink

by André Cis

Click here to read the original German version

You may consider Silvio Nickol‘s move from Lake Wörth to the Austrian capital as a rather logical step, or in any case a significant one. After more and more signs emerged showing that the luxury hotel chain Capella’s flagship was sinking, it had only been a question of time when chef Nickol would accept the chance for a new challenge.

It seemed that Palais Coburg owner Peter Pühringer had no intention of revitalizing the gourmet restaurant in his luxurious Viennese hotel venue after the sudden departure of Austrian master chef Christian Petz at the end of 2008, right after the restaurant was awarded its 4th toque by the GaultMillau restaurant guide. Far from it, the situation fit the economic crisis well, due to a considerable drop in fine dining in Vienna over the past few years. This recently culminated in the cancellation of the new Shangri-La Hotel,leaving master chef Joachim Gradwohl unemployed.

Try the new kitchen at Coburgbastei Nr. 4 — and let’s be honest: One of the world’s best wine collections deserves a fine restaurant as companion.

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Simon Says: Daily Food Quote, July 21, 2011

By Friday, July 22, 2011 Permalink

Good bread is the most fundamentally satisfying of all foods; and good bread with fresh butter, the greatest of feasts.–James Beard

James Beard (1903-1985) was an American chef and food writer who authored 20 books and was instrumental in bringing French cooking to America in the 1950s. World Culinary Institute gives a brief biography. His legacy lives on through the James Beard Foundation.

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