Food Art: Black and White Wednesday, a food photography exhibit by Rosa Mayland | No category

Food Art: Black and White Wednesday, a food photography exhibit by Rosa Mayland

By Friday, March 30, 2012 Permalink

Rosa Mayland ponders on the meaning and significance of food in everyday life in her column Rosa’s Musings. She has the advantage of growing up in an incredibly multicultural environment and speaking many languages. She runs the site Rosa’s Yummy Yums. “Terroir with TLC” is the word chez Rosa — quality ingredients, regional and seasonal produce, made with tender loving care — and this is reflected in the recipes she creates.

Rosa recently started photographing in black and white and we find them delightful. This is her first one-woman show of B&W food photography.

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Food Art: Black and White Wednesday, a food photography exhibit by Rosa Mayland | No category

Simon Says: Daily Food Quote, March 30, 2012

By Friday, March 30, 2012 Permalink

by Simón de Swaan

Bubbles are the gracenotes of champagne.–Anonymous

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Food Art: Black and White Wednesday, a food photography exhibit by Rosa Mayland | No category

Simple Sustenance: Roasted Cauliflower with Kalamata Olives and Lemon-Parsley Gremolata

By Thursday, March 29, 2012 Permalink

Mediterranean Flair: Roasted Cauliflower with Kalamata Olives and Lemon-Parsley Gremolata

by Renu Chhabra

 

Food is our common ground, a universal experience.– James Beard

 

Spring is in the air, a season for new growth and rejuvenation. Everywhere we look, nature is awakening from its long winter rest. With flowers blooming and landscape covered with a blanket of green, there is a sense of new life welcoming the ever-inspiring spring, signifying a fresh start. And what better way to celebrate this beautiful time than to cook up something delicious with fresh ingredients and clean flavors just like the season itself.

Growing up I was always intrigued by cauliflower, a vegetable that came in a beautiful green leafy package. Peel off the leaves, and a white head of tiny trees clustered together greeted me. It was like removing gift wrap to find a lovely present inside. And who doesn’t like presents? I guess, that is why I have always loved this vegetable — a beautifully packaged gift from Mother Nature.

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Food Art: Black and White Wednesday, a food photography exhibit by Rosa Mayland | No category

French Food Fact: What’s a Cromesquis?

By Thursday, March 29, 2012 Permalink

 

by Jonell Galloway

Cromesquis are back in fashion as an hors d’oeuvre. They are made with a salpicon wrapped in pig’s caul or slices of salt pork, then dipped in batter and deep-fried to make a croquette.

 

Photo courtesy of Patrick Chazallet.

Contemporary chefs like to make the salpicon a little runny so that when you bite into the croquette, the liquid squirts into your mouth. I first ate the contemporary version of cromesquis at Ferran Adria’s El Bulli about 12 or 13 years ago.

 

Note: A salpicon consists of ingredients that are diced and bound with a sauce.
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Simon Says: Daily Food Quote, March 29, 2012

By Thursday, March 29, 2012 Permalink

by Simón de Swaan

Bread always falls on its buttered side.–English proverb

Photo courtesy of http://3.bp.blogspot.com/_pwrKRcgY4w4/S9XFGRE2sDI/AAAAAAAAATo/xZyDtpawfYs/s1600/ButteredToast.jpg

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Simon Says: Daily Food Quote, March 28, 2012

By Wednesday, March 28, 2012 Permalink

by Simón de Swaan

Vodka is cursed, tea is twice cursed, coffee and tobacco are thrice cursed.–Russian proverb

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Cross-Continental Cuisine: Chicken Liver Pâté with Cava and Ginger Sangria

By Tuesday, March 27, 2012 Permalink

by SandeeA and Tricia Martin

Pate al cava / Giger sangria
I spent most of my childhood dreaming about food I’d read about in books: Enyd Blyton’s pies and ginger ale; feasting with Astérix and Obélix and those fantastic roast boars… Now, thanks to this Cross Continental Cooking project with Tricia Martin from Eating is Art, I know how to prepare my own ginger ale… who would have ever thought it? And you must take a look at her highly original ginger sangria recipe. And kudo to her for starting still another project, Studio Tricia Martin. I suggest you have a look; she is a true artist.

Pate al cava / Ginger sangria

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Simon Says: Daily Food Quote, March 27, 2011

By Tuesday, March 27, 2012 Permalink

by Simón de Swaan

Hunger is felt by a slave and hunger is felt by a king.–Ghanaian proverb

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Sauce for Thought: Sweet Flower of Dreams

By Monday, March 26, 2012 Permalink

 

by Alice DeLuca

A little prehistoric flower has been grown, re-created really, from 32,000 year-old seeds found in the ancient den of an artic ground squirrel. The photo of the little white flower in the New York Times [i] brought a rush of excitement and a feeling of kinship with the scientists who sought to cover those seeds with earth and add water, to cup their hands and breathe warm air over the planting, revealing the sprouts last seen by the tiny ground squirrel so long ago. I have the same feeling when reading an antique recipe that might bring back the flavors of the ancestors. Can we breathe life in to an antique delicacy and resurrect a better flavor? Why did people add rose geraniums to their jelly, infuse herring pie[ii] with grains de paradis[iii], or even stir and stir to create cornstarch pudding for that matter? Perhaps they knew a marvelous flavor-way or texture that has been lost to us, overtaken by food fads and conveniences of the present day?

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Food Art: Campari Orange Macarons, food photography by Meeta Khurana Wolff

By Monday, March 26, 2012 Permalink

See more food photo compositions at Meeta K. Wolff.

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