Taste Unlocked: Food & Thought

By Tuesday, June 26, 2018 Permalink 1

Taste Unlocked: Food & Thought

France and Italy’s relationship through time, wine & food

PROGRAM FOR 4-DAY MASTERCLASS TASTING WEEKEND IN CHARTRES

with Jonell Galloway and James Flewellen

4th to 7th October 2018
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Course Overview

FRANCE AND ITALY ARE TITANS OF EUROPEAN culinary culture. The nations of today are inheritors of rich culinary traditions that are the result of millennia of interweaving relationships between the peoples who inhabit these lands. This is a process that predates even the Romans and continues very much into the 21st century.

Over this four-day weekend, we explore the culinary and vinous relationships between France and Italy from Roman times through to today. We will look at what each nation has gifted the other through various lenses, including food, drink and culinary culture.

The masterclass involves sumptuous feasting, tutored wine tastings, and intellectual discussion. Bring your taste buds, something to say and a willingness to learn!

 

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DR JAMES FLEWELLEN is a biophysicist, wine writer and educator based in London. He learned his trade in taste during his doctoral studies at Oxford University, leading the university’s blind tasting team to victories in numerous international competitions. Since then he has completed his WSET Level 4 Diploma in Wine and Spirits and written a Gourmand award-winning guide to blind tasting. He is a judge for the International Wine Challenge and gives regular wine education tastings in London, bringing his scientific expertise to bear on questions of high taste.

JONELL GALLOWAY grew up on Wendell Berry and food straight from a backyard Kentucky garden. She attended Le Cordon Bleu and La Varenne cooking schools in Paris as well as the Academie du Vin. She ran a cooking school in France, and owned a farm-to-table restaurant, The Three Sisters’ Café, with her two sisters in the U.S. Jonell is a freelance writer who has worked for the GaultMillau guides The Best of France and The Best of Paris and CityGuides, amongst others. She has collaborated on many projects including Le tour du monde en 80 pains with Jean-Philippe de Tonnac in France, At the Table: Food and Family around the World with Ken Albala, Ma Cuisine Méditerranéenne with Christophe Certain, and André Raboud: Sculptures 2002-2008.


Contact Details

The course takes place in the Rue Saint-Pierre, Chartres, France, in a beautiful converted 11th-century chapel.

This map shows the masterclass venue in relation to central Chartres. Note the cathedral in the top of the map. The train station is just off the map, to the top left. The venue is located at a curve in the road, has a small courtyard in the front and a turret.

Chartres is easily accessible from Paris by train. There is also plenty of car parking in the city center. For further details on how to travel, please get in touch.

Our email address is: info@tasteunlocked.com.
Feel free to contact us for any reason.

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Course Schedule

DAY 1 – Thursday
ARRIVAL afternoon / evening

Arrival into Chartres
Please let us know if you would like to be met at the station and shown to your accommodation.

6:30 PM COCKTAIL
We meet at 1 Rue Saint-Pierre over a local Loire sparkling wine for an informal introduction to the weekend ahead.

7:30 PM DINNER
A home-cooked meal prepared using local ingredients and heritage Beauce recipes. Each course is paired with wine sourced from the Loire Valley. After dinner, the evening is free for a walk to see the medieval city center and the light displays of the cathedral.

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DAY 2 – Friday

11:00 AM – 12:15 PM CULINARY INSIGHTS 1: La Cucina Povera
Meet at 1 Rue Saint-Pierre for our first culinary insights discussion of the weekend. In this session, Jonell will lead an exploration into the culinary links between France and Italy, focusing in particular on how frugality has inspired innovation in food production and cooking. All guests are invited to contribute to the discussion if they wish.

12:30 PM INTRODUCTION TO WINE TASTING
James presents an informal introduction to wine tasting, paving the way for the skills we’ll need to taste and discuss wines over lunch. We’ll discuss aromas, flavors and structural elements such as acidity, alcohol, sugar, and tannin as well as covering what makes a “good” wine and how wines interact with food.

1:15 PM LUNCH
We continue our discussions over a meal paired with wines from around France.

2:30 PM FREE TIME

7:45 PM DINNER AT 1 RUE SAINT-PIERRE
Meet at 7.45 pm for dinner at 8:00 pm. Jonell will prepare a home-cooked meal bringing to mouth-watering fullness our theoretical discussions from throughout the day. James will select wines to match with each course, further illustrating the interplay between wine and food.

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DAY 3 – Saturday
Morning FREE TIME / GUIDED MARKET VISIT
The morning is free for you to enjoy Chartres. You are very welcome to join Jonell for a guided tour of the market as she sources ingredients for the weekend’s meals.

12:00 PM GUIDED TOUR OF CHARTRES CATHEDRAL
We meet at La Cathédrale Notre-Dame de Chartres – one of the medieval wonders of the world – for a guided tour conducted by Malcolm Miller. Malcolm has been leading tours at Chartres Cathedral since 1958; there really can be no better guide to this astonishing building.

1:30 PM – 2:30 PM LUNCH
We return to 1 Rue Saint-Pierre for a light lunch

2:30 PM FREE TIME

5:45 – 7:45 PM WINE TASTING & CULINARY INSIGHTS 2: Franco-Italian links via wine

Convene at 1 Rue Saint-Pierre by 5.30 pm. James leads a discussion on the relationships between France and Italy through wine. We’ll look at historical influences of different French and Italian peoples on winemaking technology and traditions as well as how France and Italy influence each other in the 21st century. All accompanied by a tutored wine tasting!

8:00 PM DINNER AT RESTAURANT SAINT-HILAIRE
At 7.45 pm we walk down to noted local foodie establishment Restaurant Saint-Hilaire. There we will be treated to a three-course set menu of classic, innovative French cuisine using only local products, with each course paired with Loire Valley wines – the perfect setting to continue our wine tasting discussions.

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DAY 4 – Sunday
Morning FREE TIME

12:00 PM LUNCH AT 1 RUE SAINT-PIERRE

1:30 – 2:30 PM CULINARY INSIGHTS 3: La Cucina Moderna
Following lunch, Jonell leads our final session of the masterclass, focusing on how the cuisines of both France and Italy have evolved and influenced each other in the 20th and 21st centuries – particularly as technology and the politics of a post-WW2 Europe have led to greater affluence and global influence of these two great nations.

The afternoon is available fortravelingg onwards, or for exploring Chartres in more detail.

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Food and Wine Tasting Masterclass in Chartres

By Thursday, June 15, 2017 Permalink 0

Exploring the Food and Wine of the Beauce and the Loire Valley

Award-winning wine writer, James Flewellen, and Cordon Bleu-educated cook and food journalist, Jonell Galloway, present wine and food tasting masterclasses in the historic French city of Chartres. Comprising dedicated wine tastings, sumptuous meals made from local ingredients paired with regional Loire Valley wines and a unique, “sense-awakening” taste experience, our food and wine holiday courses will help unlock your taste buds and introduce the richness of aromas, flavors and textures present in food and wine.

  • Courses conducted in English
  • All lunches, dinners, and wine included
  • We use only the highest quality, locally-sourced produce and ingredients
  • Over 10 hours of professional food and wine tasting instruction
  • Taste over 20 (4-day course) different wines from the Loire Valley
  • Learn the art of food and wine pairing
  • Dine and learn in a 1,000-year-old converted chapel
  • Socialize with like-minded wine- and food-lovers
  • Experience the atmosphere of the Chartres Festival of Lights in a UNESCO World Heritage site
  • Guided city tour & collection from the station included

Click here for more details.

Dates for our 2017 masterclass are now confirmed:

  • Our signature 4-day Taste Unlocked masterclass costs €695pp and runs from 14–17 September, coinciding with the world-famous Chartres Fête de la Lumière.

James and Jonell are also available for bespoke tasting courses and events throughout the year for groups of 4 or more. Please contact us for more information.

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Taste Unlocked Equinox 2015

By Monday, September 21, 2015 Permalink 0

Taste Unlocked Autumn Equinox 2015 in Chartres, France

Taste Unlocked 2015 was a great success. Our guests have returned to England, but the house reverberates with the still-fresh memories of their presence and the joys of good food, fine wine and the excellent company we shared. Happy souvenirs of their visit, a few unfinished bottles we tasted will be emptied in coming days, but we shall toast our special guests each time we partake.

I prepared traditional dishes from the Beauce region, using the recipes I’ve researched over the years and the best products from local farmers and producers. These were accompanied by what we consider our local wine, that of the Loire Valley, which starts less than 50 miles down the road from here.

ChartresCathedralLighted2

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We kicked off the weekend on Thursday over a dinner of locally farmed duck cooked in Eure-et-Loire apple cider and served with Beauce turnips and carrots and apples. This was followed by a curried green gauge plum sautée with Financier almond cake.

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3-DAY TASTE AWAKENING COURSE IN CHARTRES

By Tuesday, June 30, 2015 Permalink 0

SEPTEMBER 17-20, 2015, DURING AUTUMN EQUINOX AND LIGHT FESTIVAL IN CHARTRES, FRANCE

Award-winning wine writer James Flewellen and Cordon Bleu-educated cook and food journalist Jonell Galloway present food and wine tasting masterclasses in the historic French city of Chartres. Comprising dedicated wine tastings, sumptuous meals made from local ingredients paired with regional Loire Valley wines and a unique, “sense-awakening” taste experience, our food and wine holiday courses will help unlock your taste buds and introduce the richness of aromas, flavours and textures present in food and wine. A music festival, with live music in the streets, restaurants, theatres, churches and bars, is held to celebrate the Autumn Equinox and to mark the end of the Festival of Lights. To sign up, please click here or fill in the contact form below.

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Concise Guide to Wine & Blind Tasting

By Thursday, June 18, 2015 Permalink 0

Book Review: The Concise Guide to Wine & Blind Tasting

by Jonell Galloway

The Concise Guide to Wine & Blind Tasting is destined to become a modern classic. Written by Neel Burton, psychiatrist and Oxford professor, and James Flewellen, biophysicist at Oxford – together founders of the Oxford Wine Academy — the book is well stocked with vital information about all aspects of wine, from soil and vine to drinking for pleasure and blind tasting.

Its clear, detailed information will appeal to serious amateurs and experienced professionals alike. The first three chapters tackle the history of wine as well as the principles of viticulture and winemaking, using an approach unique to the authors, reflecting their methodical way of thinking and scientific backgrounds. This section serves as a comprehensive, accessible introduction for less seasoned wine drinkers, giving them a firm technical basis and the curiosity to want to continue learning.

The ensuing twenty-three chapters address the world’s geographic regions, including three dedicated to notable French appellations, sparkling wine and fortified wine, respectively. Chapters are well structured, dealing with the lie of the land, climate, soil, grape varieties, appellations, and wine styles, and give thorough attention to each of these components. The authors explain how to differentiate wines based on the interplay of these factors, and address the effect of appearance, palate and nose and how these interact with one’s senses and perceptions. This section serves as a reference for even the most seasoned wine drinker.

For those interested in blind tasting, the appendices explain how to set up a blind tasting, and include crib sheets by grape and terroir — a most useful reference for those interested in honing their skills — along with international classification systems and food and wine matching.

This is both a user’s manual and a connoisseur’s guide, and its clear and fluent exposition sets it apart from other guides. You’ll keep this reference book on your shelf; its pages will yellow (and possibly purple) and show their wear and tear. You might even pass it on to your grandchildren. That’s how good it is.

 

 

 

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3-DAY TASTE AWAKENING COURSE 19-21 JUNE, DURING CHARTRES SUMMER SOLSTICE MUSIC FESTIVAL

By Wednesday, March 11, 2015 Permalink 0

3-DAY TASTE AWAKENING COURSE 19-21 JUNE,
DURING CHARTRES SUMMER SOLSTICE MUSIC FESTIVAL

Award-winning wine writer, James Flewellen, and Cordon Bleu-educated chef and food journalist, Jonell Galloway, present wine and food tasting masterclasses in the historic French city of Chartres. Compromised dedicated wine tastings, sumptuous meals made from local ingredients paired with regional Loire Valley wines and a unique, ‘sense-awakening’ taste experience, our food and wine holiday courses will help unlock your taste buds and introduce the richness of aromas, flavours and textures present in food and wine. A music festival, with live music in the streets, restaurants, theatres, churches and bars, is held to celebrate the Summer Solstice. If you’re interested in signing up, please click here.

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The Art of Tasting Wine with James Flewellen: Top 10 White Wine Grapes

By Sunday, June 23, 2013 Permalink 0

The Art of Tasting Wine with James Flewellen: Top 10 White Wine Grapes

by James Flewellen

With over 1,300(!) vine varieties out there making commercial wine, it’s a tough task to narrow down to only 10. Nevertheless, here are my ‘top 10’ white wine producing grapes. The order is my own preference, based on commercial importance, potential quality of the grape and whether it produces a ‘classic style’.

10. Albariño

Deutsch: Albariño-Weingut. Weingut Granbazan. ...

Bodega Granbazán en las Rías Baixas, producer of Albariño

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Perhaps a controversial start to the list, Albariño is a rising star in my book. The grape can produce well-balanced aromatic, peachy wines with fresh acidity, suitable as an aperitif or with fish and vegetarian dishes. It’s not yet grown much outside its native Galicia in Spain (and parts of Portugal), yet its stature is certainly on the up and much interest is being shown in growing the grape in a number of new world countries.

9. Gewurztraminer

Tramin - Gewurztraminer Grapes

Tramin – Gewurztraminer Grapes (Photo credit: Lynne Hand)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A very distinctive grape producing ‘love-em or hate-em’ wines. Gewurztraminer has its spiritual home in Alsace, France, though can be found throughout Central Europe and in many new world countries. The grape is typically pink-skinned and produces an abundance of sugars in the right growing conditions. This leads to deeply-coloured, rich, full-bodied wines – many of which are off-dry, or even sweet. Gewurztraminer wines are flamboyantly fragrant with unmistakable notes of lychee, pot pourri and sometimes cloves.

8. Viognier

English: Viognier grapes ripening on a vine in...

Viognier grapes ripening on a vine in Amador county, California.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Another full-bodied, distinctively aromatic wine. Viognier brings forth characteristic notes of peach, apricot and ginger. The very best examples come from the tiny appellation of Condrieu, in the Rhône Valley in France. However, it is found in the blended white wines of southern France, and increasingly in the new world. A single producer in the Barossa, South Australia — Yalumba — could be credited with re-popularising this grape and bringing it to a new audience in the modern era.

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The Art of Tasting Wine with James Flewellen: Quality

By Tuesday, October 30, 2012 Permalink 0

by James Flewellen

One of the common themes running through my wine education courses and writings is that you, the taster, are the final authority on whether you like a wine or not. While I can tell you whether a wine is well made, and give my perception of the aromas, flavours and structure of a wine, I can’t get inside your head to assess your perception of a wine or whether you like it or not.

There are, however, some objective guidelines on assessing a wine for its quality. These are espoused by the WSET and various other wine educators and can be remembered easily by the acronym ‘BLIC‘.

B is for balance. A well-balanced wine will have a consistency between the aromas you smell and flavours you taste. The acidity will match the body of the wine and any sweetness. It won’t be sharp and unpleasant; nor will it be flabby and soft. The alcohol will suit the body of the wine and not be too harsh nor weak. If a wine has been aged in oak, then the level of oak will support the natural fruit flavours rather than overwhelm them. One factor that should be taken into consideration is the age of a wine and when it is expected to be drunk. A barrel sample of a very fine wine will not necessarily be in balance, yet it should be by the time the wine is ready to be drunk a decade later. One of the hardest jobs I’ve seen in the wine business is that of winemakers assess their newly-fermented wine and to make decisions on how to mature it based on their projections of how the wine will develop.

The length of the wine is straightforward. Simply: the longer the better. After swallowing, the finest wines will linger over your senses for many tens of seconds, even minutes in some cases! The one caveat is that the remaining flavours should be enjoyable. I’ve had at least one occasion of a wine with a very bitter flavour and an unpleasantly long finish.

Intensity is the next criterion. It’s a bit of a double-edged sword in that an overly intense wine can be overwhelming in some cases. If a particular aroma or flavour dominates at the expense of the balance or complexity of the wine, then too much intensity is a bad thing. However, with this in mind, the best wines will have an intensity and concentration of flavour that is precise yet generous.

Finally, we have complexity. This is perhaps the most difficult criterion for a wine to achieve. Complexity in a wine begins with high quality grapes. The vineyard must be well tended and the grapes healthy before a winemaker can make great wine. The winemaker’s skill is in preserving the complex biochemicals that occur naturally in the grape, enhancing and concentrating them, while still maintaining balance. Further complexity in a wine is achieved through judicious use of oak for maturation. Finally, the time spent in bottle results in further subtle and complex chemical reactions that develop ever new flavours in a wine. The end result of a fine wine that is opened at its optimal age for drinking is a plethora of aromas and flavours that change and evolve in the glass. The exact aromas and sensations can be hard to describe, yet the finish always leaves you wanting more!

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James Flewellen is The Rambling Epicure wine columnist. James is a biophysicist at the University of Oxford. Originally from New Zealand, the huge range of wine James discovered in Europe spurred his interest in all things vinous. He became involved in the University’s Blind Wine Tasting Society and has recently completed a two-year term as its President. During this time he represented the University in a number of domestic and international wine tasting competitions, winning several awards. He is currently completing the WSET Diploma in Wine and Spirits. James has a passion for wine communication and education and runs the Oxford Wine Blog and the Oxford Wine Academy.

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