Food Poetry: Fame is a Fickle Food, by Emily Dickinson

By Sunday, February 17, 2013 Permalink 0
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Fame is a Fickle Food

Emily Dickinson

Emily Dickinson

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Fame is a fickle food
Upon a shifting plate
Whose table once a
Guest but not
The second time is set
Whose crumbs the crows inspect
And with ironic caw
Flap past it to the
Farmer’s corn
Men eat of it and die

 

Emily Dickinson was born in 1830 and died in 1886. The Poetry Foundation describes her as “A poet who took definition as her province, Emily Dickinson challenged the existing definitions of poetry and the poet’s work. Like writers such as Ralph Waldo Emerson, Henry David Thoreau, and Walt Whitman, she experimented with expression in order to free it from conventional restraints.” Read more of Emily Dickinson’s biography on Poetry Foundation.

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