Follow us!Follow on FacebookTweet about this on TwitterFollow on Google+Pin on PinterestFollow on TumblrFollow on LinkedIn

no images were found

Never miss a post
Name: 
Your email address:*
Please enter all required fields
Correct invalid entries
Print Friendly, PDF & Email
859 Comments
  • Leonor White
    November 2, 2010

    This looks delicious, and easy to make, definitely something to try out!

  • The Sediment Blog
    January 19, 2011

    Can’t afford the wines… Can’t afford the flights… We’ll settle for the book, then.

    • David Downie
      January 20, 2011

      I hope you enjoy the book. In Food Wine Burgundy you’ll find some wineries in or near Beaune whose products you will be able to afford. If not Beaune, then the Cote Chalonnaise or the Maconnais, where some fabulously good whites are being made these days. Let me know. Thanks, David

  • Anne
    January 19, 2011

    I love those spontaneous inventions! I used to eat café-au-lait-oats as a tennager years ago. Thanks for reminding me though!

  • Rosa
    January 19, 2011

    Very interesting! I loved reading this post. I will have to remember this method next time I roast some pork.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • Jonell Galloway
    January 20, 2011

    There’s another one that is very good that my mother made up. On Sundays she would make homemade biscuits, and we’d pour sugared coffee over them. Her best spontaneous recipe was to sprinkle brown sugar and cinnamon over the biscuits and lightly brown them. Now my mouth is watering . . .

  • Meeta
    January 20, 2011

    “They swirl
    and burn, the river rising inside you

    till there you are, brim, half-bobbing
    with affection, laughter, half-drowning,
    kissing, saying, yes, my darling, yes, …”

    Simply wonderful! Thanks for sharing this.

  • Merelyn Frank
    January 21, 2011

    Jonell I just love your borscht belt. Can I introduce you to the Monday Morning Cooking Club (MMCC)? (http://www.facebook.com/MondayMorningCookingClub). We are a group of 6 Sydney Jewish women who have spent the last four years creating a unique, soon-to-be-released book “Monday Morning Cooking Club – the food the stories the sisterhood”. (Due April 2011.) It is a collection of treasured old and new recipes; recipes from a community obsessed with food, from generations past and present, creating a record and an heirloom for generations to come. The book has 150 recipes from 65 cooks. Each cook tells the story of how they came to love cooking, and often how they arrived in Australia.
    We want to inspire people to return to their kitchens – to find their own “sisterhood” and look into their own families and communities for the delicious and important recipes that should be preserved. We are donating all profits to charity.
    I’d love to stay in touch.

  • Chocolate Fairy
    January 24, 2011

    What a great post! Moving, intelligent words on how to enjoy eating deserts intuitively and a fabulous recipe to boot! It’s true that when we allow ourselves to enjoy and savour food without restricting ourselves then we don’t need to overdo it. I always feel sad when I see women desperately trying to satisfy their sweet tooth with the ‘more healthy’ option which is often sadly less tasty and less satisfying, meaning they end up eating a lot more of it…Thanks for this lovely post!

  • Sylvie @ Gourmande in the Kitchen
    January 25, 2011

    What a wonderful article about embracing the joy that dessert is meant to bring us when we eat it rather than the guilt which so often accompanies it instead. I have only had the French version of pinolata before, called “tarte aux pignons”, which is very popular in Nice. They do look very similar, I would guess that would be due to the strong Italian influence that is often seen in the cuisine niçoise.

  • Rosa
    January 25, 2011

    A wonderful article! So well-written and -thought. I enjoyed reading it and that Pinolata is divine looking.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • Nan Fry
    January 26, 2011

    A lovely, vertiginous poem!

    Cheers!

  • Jamie
    January 27, 2011

    Gorgeous photos. I have always preferred simple, sharp, straightforward photos of food and these are perfect! It’s nice to meet you, Alison!

  • Abigail Adams Greenway
    January 28, 2011

    We LOVE this poem. MORE! …….

  • Tina
    January 28, 2011

    Translation: eat more cheese & chocolate. Vive la Suisse.

  • Sue Denney
    January 30, 2011

    The wrap with Asparagus, mint/fresh basil and a small dish with dipping sauce intrigues me. I doubt the wrap is a linen napkin, but the presentation is artful. Perhaps the wrap is made with spring roll, rice or wonton sheets !

  • Priscilla Pointer
    January 30, 2011

    These pictures by Alison Harris are extraordinary— making food into Art.

  • Flo Makanai
    January 31, 2011

    I’m really hapy you’re a few to now offer recipes with ingredients measured by weight! Heidi Swanson from 101 Cookbooks does it and I love it, and now Shauna (glutenfreegirl) and you : I hope everyone will soon follow you!
    It is so much more precise + faster to just put a bowl on a scale and then adding weight after weight, instead of having to wash cups in between different ingredients and never knowing whether the cup was correctly filled or not.
    It’s also easier for kids to help with a scale because they can put the ingredients spoon by spoon, until Mom or Dad says “that’s enough”, instead of never filling the cups the way we adults would like them too 😉
    And my girls learned very early how to read the numbers on my scale, to know what a gram was etc.
    Bottom line : yes, I’m French, so yes, I’m used to scales since… always, but measuring by weight is just great 🙂

  • Flo Makanai
    January 31, 2011

    hapPy, of course! Should have reread myself, sorry!

  • Flo Makanai
    January 31, 2011

    That’s a very touching post, Rosa. Thank you for sharing such intimate and delicate thoughts. It is SO true that cooking can help cope with life’s hard moments…

  • Rosa-Mayland
    January 31, 2011

    Thank you for the comment and kind words. I’m glad you liked my article and feel the same as me regarding cooking!

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • Jeanne @ CookSister!
    February 1, 2011

    Great piece – and mmmmmm,pine nuts should be compulsory in EVERYTHING ;o) I have never been a huge one for sweets or desserts, so when I DO eat them I eat them without a shred of guilt. It’s the only way 😉

  • Jamie
    February 1, 2011

    Yay! Welcome, darling! Meeta is indeed the rare blogger who is all-around talented!

  • Meeta
    February 1, 2011

    Thanks Jamie! You are one of the people who makes me believe in myself!

  • celine
    February 1, 2011

    what a lovely post! it would appear we went through similar experiences, Rosa. I appreciate you even more than I did before, if that’s even possible.

  • arthi
    February 1, 2011

    Ah just what I want to cook for dinner…I love pesto and this ruccola cashew seems interesting and so does yr take on gnocci..brilliant Meeta

  • Rosa
    February 1, 2011

    Hi Céline. Thanks for the comment and kind words! I’m so happy to hear that you liked my article. Great to know that we have that in common…

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • Ms. Chocoholia
    February 2, 2011

    “Ken, on the other hand, came with his own milk and cookies, and no scales.”

    No wonder Barbie liked him…bet they were chocolate chip cookies…

  • lisaiscooking
    February 2, 2011

    The layer of jam and nuts looks delicious! Can’t wait to see more of your desserts here, Jamie!

  • youngandfoodish
    February 2, 2011

    Very glad to read that old-fashionable sweat and toil can make a real difference.

    Is it possible that what a baker ate the previous evening “informed” his sweat and therefore his bread?

    • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
      February 2, 2011

      hello Daniel, thanks for your comment. yes the previous evening of the baker is the core of this transubstantiation, isn’it. so an interesting article should be written around the “Last Supper”.

  • Marysol
    February 2, 2011

    Wonderful post Rosa!

    Cooking is one of the most therapeutic tasks I “succumb” to each day (G) It relaxes me, clears my mind, but it also brings my troops together at the table to share our day.

  • Rosa
    February 2, 2011

    Dear Marysol, thanks fro the comment! A very positive activity indeed. 🙂

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • Raina
    February 3, 2011

    Hi Rosa! I definitely agree. Cooking is very therapeutic for me, and when I share my food with family and friends and it makes them happy, it makes me feel great.

    Thank your for sharing this wonderful recipe:)

    • Rosa
      February 3, 2011

      Thanks for the comment! I’m glad you think the same was as me.

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Jennfurla
    February 3, 2011

    You have agreat way about you Rosa, Lovely read.

    • Rosa
      February 3, 2011

      Thanks so much, dear! 😀

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Aldy
    February 3, 2011

    Rosa, What a beautiful post. I too went through a similar experience.Thanks for sharing such valuable things 🙂

    Bravo!

    Cheers,

    Aldy.

  • Abigail Adams Greenway
    February 3, 2011

    I spy….in my little eye…..One FABULOUS…..CHOCOLATE REPORTER…..!!!
    What a terrific article!……Right out of James Bond!…..I was fully expecting them to quietly remove you by slipping you into a VAT of Deep, Dark……ummmmmmm….CHOCOLATE!
    Whew! that was a close call!

  • Paige
    February 3, 2011

    Fantastic poem, as usual! I love it. Keep them coming.

  • Paige
    February 3, 2011

    Next time we’re in NYC, we are definitely going to find Kee’s. Thanks for the article, Tina.

  • Paige
    February 3, 2011

    Beautiful and scrumptious!

  • Loopback Address
    February 3, 2011

    Ok, you have piqued my interest….

    How did Rudolf Lindt, the father of conching, figure it out? What is the relationship between Lindt and Sprüngli (my haunt in Zurich then and now)?

  • S. Kenyon
    February 3, 2011

    I’ve had a few doors shut a little too loudly behind me in my time so I can surely relate to your adventure, and some of my missions weren’t as innocent as yours, Christina. What I love about your columns on this site are the little details you provide that lead us down alleys I wouldn’t have even known existed. It was pure delight learning about “conching” today, and I think it’s so cool that the link to find out more is put there so
    conveniently within the text as all the best blogs do. The stylish writing was a happy distraction from my own, and I do look forward to many more morse such tasty morsels from you!

  • Rosa
    February 3, 2011

    Good to know that you liked my article. 😀

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • Tom Leachman
    February 3, 2011

    Very interesting article Ms. Daub. I too enjoyed learning about conching. Maybe your interrogator was semi-sweet for you.

  • Tom Leachman
    February 3, 2011

    Clever and clear description about how to make a heart shaped cake. Great idea! Thanks.

  • Margie Layfield
    February 4, 2011

    Your words have touched my soul, Rosa. Thank you for sharing them.

    • Rosa
      February 4, 2011

      I am happy to know that. Thanks!

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Deeba
    February 4, 2011

    I really really enjoyed your post Rosa. Food has so much more potential to unify in the world, it is amazing. My life has changed with food, especially blogging. I love the connect your lemon curd offers. This is post I can ‘immerse’ in! Congrats on your first arite up here!

    • Rosa
      February 6, 2011

      Thank you, Deeba! Yes, food has no borders and unites people. That is one thing we all have in common…

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • gracianne
    February 4, 2011

    Very good post Rosa (as usual). I always thought cooking was a meditation, but it is the first time I see the idea put into words. I am glad the therapy worked for you, and we got to know you.

    • Rosa
      February 6, 2011

      Thanks, dear! I’m also glad to have got to know you through this medium…

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • marla
    February 4, 2011

    Beautiful photos Meeta!

  • marla
    February 4, 2011

    Rosa, I never knew we had so much in common (well kind thought we did.) Cooking takes me to places I never thought possible. It also helps me stay clear of my own rambling thoughts. Great to keep busy with something that nourishes the soul 🙂

    • Rosa
      February 6, 2011

      I’m glad to hear that! 🙂 Cooking is such a wonderfuk activity that brings balance, peace and harmony in one’s life.

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Rosa
    February 4, 2011

    A very well-written article! That must have been an even more difficlt job then. Quite a sacrifice. Seeing those poor people slaving away in the bakery and fighting their battle against the dough must have been quite a spectacle. No wonder bread is considered a sacred item…

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • Sweet Artichoke
    February 4, 2011

    It is all so true and so nicely written! Thanks for sharing a part of your life and a truly delicious recipe.
    Whenever I say to people that cooking is like meditation and therapy for me, I usually receive puzzled looks, raised eyebrows and even not-so-nice comments … if only they knew…

    • Rosa
      February 6, 2011

      Thanks! Yes, they are missing out something here… So sad some people don’t know how blissful it is to be in the kitchen and let your creativity flow freely.

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    February 4, 2011

    yes a sacrifice. as the one of the god-made man. the bread rises from the sweat and the blood.

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    February 4, 2011

    a delicious obsession

  • Fred Schroeder
    February 5, 2011

    This story was delightful. You transported me to a different time and place, and then from the expected to the unexpected, while providing a wealth of usable chocolaty information. I loved the foreign intrigue. I hope you can devote a future column to explaining the cultural differences among the European choclatiers — the Belgians, the Dutch, the Germans, the Swiss, the Italians, the French, and more — and why they give us their unique varieties of chocolate cuisine.

    • Tina
      February 14, 2011

      It’s on my to write list. Thanks.

  • Vanille
    February 6, 2011

    So agree with all you have detailed. You have also highlighted some aspects I’ve never thought of before really. A good read ! I should send it to one of my sister, actually to convert her !
    And your Grandmother’s lemon curd recipe, so valuable, thank you for sharing !

    • Rosa
      February 6, 2011

      Thank you! I’m glad you like that recipe. Hopefully you’ll be able to convert your sister… 😉

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Linda Aber
    February 9, 2011

    Love this article. Truffle Thieves seem to exist in every home,and it may be because of a German medical study which says that a chocolate a day keeps heart disease away. Leaving a “hole” in the writer’s heart is a lovely image which gives new meaning to “crimes of the heart.” Thank you for sharing…even if you don’t like to share so much anymore.

    • Tina
      February 14, 2011

      O, I do like to share but not with people who steal the goods before I can even offer them!

  • Susan Barr
    February 9, 2011

    Such fun to read, I’m left smiling… and wishing I HAD some chocolate in the house… is such a thing a sin (no chocolate near to hand)??

    • Tina
      February 14, 2011

      gasp…no chocolate…not even cocoa…?

  • Rosemary
    February 10, 2011

    Stunning, love nuts!

  • Anne Zaya
    February 10, 2011

    Rosa,
    I so enjoyed finding your blog today. I am trying to get started with blogging, and have wanted to write a book (too much info. as it would be many many novels), but my son feels I should learn to blog.

    Baking saved my life 46 years ago, and I discovered a passion for baking when finally, after a hard year of tossing my Parker Rolls into the trash (I called them my hockey pucks), I found the SECRET to bread baking. Then I was on a ROLL, and have never stopped.

    Coupling my passion of baking with photography and music, really drew me into your site.

    Congrats to you for continuing your site for 10+ years, and finally having your work in The Rambling Epicure. I loved the story about the lemon curd and your grandmother and family.

  • Tina
    February 10, 2011

    Talk about green music…after you are done playing the onion rings, you eat them. Bravo!

  • Priscilla
    February 10, 2011

    Thank you for sharing in such a beautifully articulate and intimate way, the many therapeutic benefits of cooking – it is so much more than a mindless pastime for housewives. To me, one of the best things about cooking is continuing traditions and connecting with your family in the past and the present and I really enjoyed that you included your grandmother’s luscious lemon curd recipe that brings back sweet memories of your childhood.

    • Rosa
      February 10, 2011

      Thank you Priscilla! I am happy to know that you’ve enjoyed my article.

      It is indeed a great way to connect with the family and to perpetuate traditions.

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Rosa
    February 10, 2011

    Dear Anne,

    Thank you for your comment and for visiting my blog as well as The Rambling Epicure! I’m glad you liked both my article and site.

    If you feel the urge to write and you are commited, then I really recommend you to start blogging. It is a very enjoyable activity, but it demands a lot of patience and hard work…

    Good to know that cooking saved your life and that you developped a passion for baking.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • julie bobrow
    February 10, 2011

    wow – what a cocktail but the pictures says it all!!!

  • Erik Wolfe
    February 11, 2011

    Delicious! Love the flavor profile. Beautiful way to start or end a cocktail party.

  • Tina
    February 14, 2011

    Bravo Wendell Berry! How well he captures the sacred act of mindful eating. Thanks for posting this.

  • Grace Cavalieri
    February 14, 2011

    Tina writes like an angel and cooks like a dream. And she is a poet.What more can we ask for on this delicious day.

    • Tina
      February 14, 2011

      Thank you, thank you, thank you. If chocolate be the food of love, bite on…

  • Linda Aber
    February 14, 2011

    Can’t wait to see Tina Daub hopping down the bunny trail with a piece on bunnies who drop eggs all along the way. Chocolate again, but there must be some eggs-iting yolk jokes worth writing too!

    • Tina
      February 14, 2011

      Well, that is the next best chocolate holiday after today…eggs-itng, yok,yok, yolk…

  • Catherine Jones
    February 14, 2011

    I have only been disappointed by cheap chocolate. I think a parade is a great idea!

    • Tina
      February 15, 2011

      Can’t you see whole troops of Brownies marching, the Hershey majorettes with kiss-shaped hats…the possibilities are endless…

  • Tom Leachman
    February 14, 2011

    Another delicous article. How is the Truffle Thief?

    • Tina
      February 15, 2011

      Truffle Thief is looking well-fattened I must say…
      Thanks.

  • Meeta
    February 15, 2011

    Fantastic stuff Jenn! I temper without a thermometer and so far have been lucky and gotten very good results. Like you I communicate through food too – it is so much more sensual and requires almost all of the senses to experience it!

  • Jenn-Cuisine
    February 16, 2011

    Thanks Meeta! And wow am I impressed that you normally temper without a thermometer!

  • Rebecca @InsideCuisine.com
    February 17, 2011

    Just love what Joost Bakker is doing in Australia and so pleased he is then taking it to the world. Great article thanks Carli!

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    February 17, 2011

    Thanks Chris, so you are a kind of bread eater for reconciliation. the best place, indeed.

  • Eric
    February 17, 2011

    Une bonne mise en bouche de tous les pains du monde..qui finissent tous par être partagés.
    En tout cas j’ai choisi mon camp depuis longtemps : les pains à croute et plutôt trop cuits que pas assez.
    Rien de tel que déguster un pain avec une bonne croute craquante et une mie avec de la “mâche”.

    Longue vie aux pains à croute!

    • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
      February 17, 2011

      Merci Eric, oui c’est presque une question de “camp” comme vous dîtes. Il y aurait une autre sujet à développer ici, celui de la “mâche” précisement. il nous manque un vocabulaire adéquat, celui que l’oenologie s’est forgé par exemple. nous réflechissons avec quelques amis au concept d’artologie (http://www.facebook.com/profile.php?id=693154614#!/home.php?sk=group_137376896325862). qu’en pensez-vous?

  • sheryl aronow
    February 18, 2011

    I love bread, and lots of varieties also. This was very informative and entertaining. Thanks!

    • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
      February 21, 2011

      Merci Sheryl, endless ways to love bread and probably more than that. good exploration.

  • Kathleen M. Wall
    February 20, 2011

    I love these categories, because it is a huge field and the categories make talking about bread more manageable – thank you!

    • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
      February 21, 2011

      Hello Kathleen, not so easy to create them (categories) as you see. maybe there are more than 10 as I propose. but from that, we can go further and discover and taste more.

  • Rosa
    February 22, 2011

    Yes, in England there are many “Indian” dishes that are not that Indian after all (a blend between both cultures just like the “curry sauce” that is poured over fish & chips)… ;-P

    Your chicken tikka looks mighty flavorful and tempting!

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • El
    February 22, 2011

    Great article. I had absolutely no idea that this dish was inspired by the English!

  • foodwanderings
    February 23, 2011

    Thanks Jonell for this lovely opportunity of being a part of your global food site. I love the different approach you take in this space and honored to be a part of the initiative. Shulie

  • Melanie
    February 23, 2011

    I love this dish. Thanks for the recipe.

  • eatnik
    February 23, 2011

    I can only assume John Cage is referring to salt?

  • Meeta
    February 23, 2011

    Thank you everyone for your comments. So glad you are liking this dish. This is fusion food at its best!

  • Susan Barr
    February 24, 2011

    Such fun to read, now if only I had some chocolate to eat whilst enjoying the article.

  • Hum Narayan kandel
    February 24, 2011

    i like the indian food because iam also indian and tandoori chef i am now working in Doha Qatar 4 star hotel i am indian chef here my fab red dishes, butter chicken, kadai chicken, chicken tikka masala, chicken tikka lababdar, chicken do payaza ,chicken sag wala, chicken korma, paneer tikka masala, dal makhani, malai kofta, like lot of dishes my specialist about this food,

  • Rivki Locker (Ordinary Blogger)
    February 25, 2011

    This looks wonderful, and I’m a big believer in using stock as well. It’s an easy way to sneak extra flavor and nutrition into a dish. I’m so pleased to have found your blog today. Looks really nice, and I look forward to following it! 🙂

  • Jean | Delightful Repast
    February 26, 2011

    When I first read Laurie Colwin, this expression about being surrounded by cooks past resonated with me because I had been saying the same thing for years. I feel very connected to my mother, grandmothers and two of my great grandmothers when I’m in the kitchen. I love using some of the pans, bowls and dishes they used and cooking some of the same foods they cooked, carrying on the tradition of good food prepared with care and love.

  • David Downie
    February 26, 2011

    Thank you for this poetic interpretation of an eternal theme. It’s interesting to note that for untold thousands of years, grain or wheat have not only symbolized fertility and life. Wheat is also French slang — ble’ — for money. “Bread” is the equivalent in American English. Grain remains one of the globe’s great commodities: its worth or cost will determine the fate of millions of hungry people worldwide. Let us hope that those who are now speculating on wheat prices reflect on their acts, and realize the profound importance of treating wheat and other grains as essential elements in the fulfillment of what should be a basic human right: to eat.

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    February 28, 2011

    thanks David for your interesting comment. can we dream about a world where wheat, and rice and corn should be free? why not. another jasmin, or rose or carnation’s revolution.

  • julie
    March 3, 2011

    sounds delicious – could use one right about now!

  • Tina
    March 3, 2011

    No wonder you don’t sleep
    And you can’t count those sheep.
    You should have tried the cocoa–
    It doesn’t make you loco,
    But gives you dreams so deep.

  • Tina
    March 3, 2011

    What is the Porsche of tea, please?

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 3, 2011

      I’ll always swear by Mariage Frères in Paris, over any British teahouse I’ve known or experienced.

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 3, 2011

      I’ll always swear by Mariage Frères in Paris over any British teahouse I know.

      • Tina
        March 3, 2011

        And the Jaguar?

  • Kerrin @ MyKugelhopf
    March 3, 2011

    aaah, tate’s ! i grew up with kathleen’s cookies, as they were known before she changed the name to tate’s. i have never tasted any of her other products in fact – her classic chocolate chip cookie is all i need. (my parents send me bags here in zürich.) suuuuper crunchy, dark, thin and buttery. i eat around the chips and save them for the end !! add to that a tall glass of milk and i’m happy. they’re also divine broken up in melted coffee ice cream. mmm.

    didn’t know about her bark, thanks for the sweet news !

    • Tina
      March 3, 2011

      Yes, I still call them Kathleen’s cookies as well! Should have put that in the article. I figure I eat hundreds/year. She says they have a shelf life of six months, though I never could wait that long to test it out. One bag is gone in a few hours if they even make it home. Did you grow up in Southampton?

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    March 3, 2011

    Le sujet est passionnant, Rosa. Il y a là la matière de tout un livre. associer, comme vous le faîtes, vie précaire et art de vivre et de se bien nourrir est essentiel à une époque ou certains experts cherchent à rendre l’économie de marché compatible avec la décroissance. la santé et l’alimentation ne sauraient être “à tout prix”. ils sont plutôt dépendants d’une certaine intelligence que nous savons mobiliser en fonction des accidents du chemin. aujourd’hui l’accident est collectif et nous devons apprendre, quels que soient nos revenus, à tirer avantage du moins plutôt que du plus. la “nouvelle révoltion française” dont parle un critique comme Michael Steinberger et qui concerne le secteur de la restauration en France, consiste pécisément à revenir à l’authentique, à l’économique et à renoncer au superflu. je suis certain que vous devriez pousser votre idée jusqu’à en faire un essai accompagné de conseils et de recettes. il aurait un grand succès.

    • Rosa
      March 7, 2011

      Merci pour votre commentaire et remarques pertinentes! Il est certain qu’à notre époque nous sommes forcés de revenir à des valeurs anciennes, à l’authetique et de se reconnecter avec la réalité.

      Il est sûr qu’un livre pourrait avoir un grand succès et intéresser bon nombre de personnes.

  • Dewi
    March 4, 2011

    Wonderful article! Seasonal produce is the best, and always inexpensive.

    • Rosa
      March 7, 2011

      Thanks so much Dewi! There’s nothing better than seasonal produces indeed.

  • Loopback Address
    March 4, 2011

    The best choco chip cookies in the world! and the shop is more than a store, it’s ….. magic! Try the almond croissants!

    • Tina
      March 5, 2011

      And the Marie Antoinette cake and the pies…

  • Victoria
    March 4, 2011

    Tina:
    What a great article! thanks for the history lesson. Im on my way to get some cookies.

    All the best,
    V

    • Tina
      March 5, 2011

      Thanks, Victoria! Where do you get them in Connecticut?

  • Donna
    March 4, 2011

    Beautifully written, well-aimed advice.

    • Rosa
      March 7, 2011

      Thank you Donna! I’m glad you liked my article.

  • kathleen
    March 4, 2011

    Tina,
    Thanks for your time and a lovely article. I appreciate you including Tate’s Bake Shop on your iconic chocolate chip cookie trail. Just baked an amazing chocolate chip layer cake….look for it in my new book in 2012.

  • Jenn@slim-shoppin
    March 4, 2011

    This flat bread looks so good. I am totally going to make this over the weekend. It’s supposed to be wet and dreary in Chicago, so what better thing to do but spend time in the kitchen – my favorite thing to do!

  • Esmaa-Self
    March 5, 2011

    Jenn,

    That sounds like a great plan! I hope you’ll let us know what you come up with during your weekend cookfest.

    Enjoy,
    Esmaa

  • Bonnie allsopp
    March 5, 2011

    Very enlightening! ( or fattening?!)
    I always wondered how they sold cookies out of a toll house, didn’t realize it was an Inn.
    Tate’s cookies are definitely a cut above. We neighbors are lucky to be able to get the special ones like whole wheat with bittersweet chocolate at the shop
    Less sinful but still divine!

  • Laura Donnelly
    March 6, 2011

    Kathleen’s (Tate’s) cookies are the best! Thanks for the great story about the history of chocolate chip cookies and Kathleen King’s contribution to the world of chocoholics.
    Years ago I brought a stash of her cookies to a remote, underdeveloped island. By the end of the week my friends and I were fighting and bargaining over the crumbs!
    Her butterscotch pecan cookies are pretty darned sweet, too!

    What’s next in the Tina’s chocolate chronicles???

  • Suzanne Hurst
    March 8, 2011

    I enjoyed reading this article very much. It is so “ludique” to read such a well constructed and humorous review. As someone who reads cookbooks from cover to cover, like a mystery novel, I would love to attend the International Cookbook Fair, but if I cannot, I’m glad there’s David Downie to take me there.

    • David Downie
      March 8, 2011

      Glad to be your vicarious reporter! The cookbook fair was great and will certainly get even better as the years go by. I’d just liked to have seen more of a sensitivity to things wholesome, sustainable, reasonable, organic and real… instead of so much frou-frou nonsense — giant, pretty much useless books by giant, self-loving chefs… and all the peacocks strutting around… and the corporate nature of the fair. But there were also many small, interesting books, and many very talented and thoughtful people attending or participating.

  • Tina
    March 8, 2011

    LOL, Bonnie. You can always ride your bike to the bakery and back to work off all those whole wheat buttery crispy encased chips. I like all the variations, but the originals will always be my staple. How do I love thee…let me count those chips. Here’s the secret, chocolate chip cookie bakers…double, no triple the chips…morsels…bits…chocolate content!

  • Tina
    March 8, 2011

    Re: fighting over the crumbs–I believe it. What kind of bargains were made?
    You get the gold medal for sharing in the first place…you must have been the most popular girl on the island. Next time, perhaps an auction?

  • Catherine Jones
    March 8, 2011

    They are the only food in my house that gets very carefully rationed.

  • Jordan
    March 9, 2011

    Can’t wait to try this one! Maybe in just a few hours even.

  • Kerri S.
    March 9, 2011

    I will never look at linguini the same way again. Great poem!

  • Tina
    March 9, 2011

    Very interesting article, Meeta. Loved the history and the tips on how to make them.

  • Jessica
    March 9, 2011

    My daughter and I compared the two recipes recently side by side and the only difference between Kathleen’s and Toll House is that Kathleen leaves out a 1/2 cup of flour, thus increasing the ratio of butter and sugar. That’s what makes hers crunchier…I still prefer the Toll House recipe, though!

    • Tina
      March 16, 2011

      I add even more butter which makes the cookies crispy on the outside and slightly chewy on the inside, and more chips. The editor is the only person I know who does not like chocolate chip cookies to which I can only reply, why not, not enough chocolate?

  • FSF
    March 10, 2011

    I wonder where this situation will leave the plantation workers.

  • Jonell Galloway
    March 10, 2011

    That is a good question indeed. Workers inevitably suffer in such situations and we should remain vigilant.

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    March 13, 2011

    Excellent choice Simón, as always. its a great pleasure to discover your daily quote. words’ flavor.

  • Three-Cookies
    March 14, 2011

    Interesting article and recipe, never heard of beet gratin before. It can also double up as a dessert if you remove seasoning and add sugar:)

    • Rosa
      March 16, 2011

      Thank you! I’ve never tried making a sweet beetroot gratin…

  • Raina
    March 15, 2011

    Great tips Rosa! I too know what it is like to have to really budget; feeding a family in this day and age can be daunting. I really appreciate this article and your excellent advice:) Your gratin sounds healthy and delicious.

    • Rosa
      March 16, 2011

      Thank you Raina! I’m glad you liked my article, tips and recipe. I can imagine that feeding a family isn’t easy if you have to control your expenses….

  • Emily
    March 15, 2011

    Thanks for the wonderful article Rosa. I remember how expensive supermarkets in Switzerland can be so at least that’s an advantage of life in Germany. I already try to do many of the things you recommend but am now trying not to go shopping too often and will stock up my freezer.

    • Rosa
      March 28, 2011

      Thanks for the comment and kind words! Yes, food is quite expensive in Switzerland.

      I am glad that you are following my advices… I hope they’ll be useful!

  • FOODESSA
    March 17, 2011

    Once more Rosa…you’ve hit the nail on the pot ;o)
    Although, I no longer have to watch my budget as tightly as I needed to when starting off with Hubby…my frugal ways have remained precious.
    I volunteer at a nearby community center for single Mothers…and they are so in need of help from responsible persons like me and you. It has been baby steps…but I am witnessing a few important changes amongst the most defensive of the bunch. I can’t wait for increased break-throughs.

    For those who are fairly new to this subject or even uncomfortable about it…you’ve just made it easier for them to open their door a little wider to better ways of managing their lives.

    Excellent article Rosa.

    Flavourful and frugal wishes,
    Claudia

    • Rosa
      March 28, 2011

      Dear Claudia,

      Thanks for passing by and for leaving a comment! I’m glad you’ve enjoyed my article. 🙂

      Even if one’s budget is not that tight, such tips can still be useful…

      Good luck with helping those single mothers. I hope your work will pay off soon.

      There is absolutely nothing to be ashamed of when you are struggling with money. The best is to have no taboo otherwise it makes things all the more difficult and unbearable…

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • marla
    March 18, 2011

    Rosa, this is such a thoughtful & wonderful post. I am with you. I try to be very budget conscious & for me the best foods are unprocessed and fresh. It is the packaged, overly processed stuff that adds up those grocery bills the quickest. Besides, I too love to cook & prefer the flavors of real whole foods. xo

    • Rosa
      March 28, 2011

      Thank you for taking the time to read my article! I’m so happy to know that you liked it and found it interesting.

      True. The best foods are unprocessed and fresh! The flavors are also better. xx

  • Magic of Spice
    March 19, 2011

    Excellent article, and love the dish!

    • Rosa
      March 28, 2011

      Thank you so much, dear! :-)))

  • Sylvia Ripley
    March 22, 2011

    Great article- love those Tate cookies

  • Maureen
    March 26, 2011

    I’m old enough to remember Elizabeth Taylor when she was in her prime. (yeah that makes me old, I know) Those lavender eyes got me every time. I used to look in the mirror as a teenager and lament that I had ugly brown eyes.

    The chocolatini sounds yummy. Maybe two would be better.

    • Tina
      March 28, 2011

      Nothing better than chocolate-colored eyes in my humble opinion.

    • Tina
      March 28, 2011

      Two would be better. For comparison’s sake, of course…

  • Tina
    March 28, 2011

    Alternative Recipe for a Chocolatini

    Rim glass in cocoa powder or if you prefer sweeter, add some icing sugar to the cocoa first.

    In a martini shaker, shake together one shot Smirnoff vanilla vodka and a shot of Godiva chocolate liquer over ice. Stir in 2 shots of cream and cocoa powder to taste. Shake quickly and strain into martini glass.

  • Tina
    March 28, 2011

    You can also use plain vodka and add Bailey’s Irish Creme to it and use creme de cacao instead of Godiva.

    Garnish with dark chocolate shavings for some added pizazz.

  • Tina
    March 28, 2011

    A friend in Bethesda just asked about recipe for the Liz Taylor Special. All you do is place your favorite truffles artfully on your plate–and if you want to buy them, instead of make them, I suggest you get the Budapest truffles at Kron in DC and then cover them completely with whipped cream.

    You might try sweetening the whipped cream with a splash of Grand Marnier and a sprinkling of sugar. This is an irresistible combination with the dark sumptuous truffles.

  • Tina
    March 28, 2011

    These are delectable-looking…

  • Tim Rise
    March 28, 2011

    I knew Elizabeth Taylor and always admired her, met her many times over the course of 30 years, and I never knew she’d endorsed Whitman’s chocolates…nor that she’d invented the chocolatini with Rock Hudson. Bravo, Miss Daub for these bits of trivia that are almost as delectable as the “Elizabeth Taylor Special” truly sounds!

    • Tina
      April 1, 2011

      Thank you. She once said she and Rock Hudson used to stay up all night while filming Giant, talking and drinking…although I wonder how many of those chocolate martinis they could have consumed before having to work a full day on the set the next day.

      • Tim Rise
        April 2, 2011

        Elizabeth was famous for her ‘hollow leg’ which allowed her to consume vast quantities of alcohol without aparent effect although clearly when paired with that world-class drinker, Richard Burton, plenty of havoc could indeed be caused!

  • Anonymous
    March 28, 2011

    I <3 chocolate :] They should make a movie out of this.

    • Tina
      April 1, 2011

      LOL. With all the aforementioned chocolate treats available in the lobby…and plenty of intermissions.
      Thanks, Anonymous!

  • Anna
    March 29, 2011

    Awesome! Elizabeth Taylor and her chocolate legacy. I did not know. She will be remembered with stars, and chocolate diamond hearts.
    But now I want to experiment with fancy chocolate cocktails!

    • Tina
      April 1, 2011

      Thanks. Let me know how they come out.
      How about a chocolatini poured over vanilla ice cream?

  • Rosa
    March 31, 2011

    Your post made me dream! Thanks to you I travelled (mentally) to Brittany…

    What a fabulous Far Breton! I have always loved that speciality as it’s texture and humbleness speak to me. You bring back childhood memories (a home classic).

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • Tania
    March 31, 2011

    The students at Harvard University recently published a cookbook on how to make gourmet meals with things readily available in the dining hall. You might check it out- pretty creative.

  • Tina
    April 1, 2011

    Winsome, blooming, yes!

  • Tina
    April 1, 2011

    Thanks. They just won the About.com Long Island Readers Choice Award for best Long Island product. Bravo, Tate’s!

  • Tina
    April 1, 2011

    Come to DC!

    Any webcasts?

    • David Downie
      April 4, 2011

      Wish we could come to DC but this time we’re only doing NYC and SF Bay Area… maybe later this year… I’ll be on the radio live a bunch of times. Check my blog for times/stations: http://blog.davidddownie.com Thanks! David

  • Tina
    April 1, 2011

    Striking pear.
    Reminds me of Ingres’ odalisques…
    Brava!

  • Fred Schroeder
    April 4, 2011

    Kudos to Tina Daub for revealing this sweet and chocolatey side of Elizabeth Taylor. My favorite Elizabeth Taylor performance is her not-at-all-sweet, superbly played role of Martha in Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf, a film that was released in 1966 on June 22, which happens to be National Chocolate Eclair Day. Tina, could you guide us to some sources of really good chocolate eclairs this side of the Atlantic?

    Thanks for your contributions to chocolate knowledge.

    Fred

  • David Downie
    April 4, 2011

    Please note that there’s an error in the day/dates… Tuesday May 10 and Wednesday May 11 are the correct dates (we looked at the wrong calendar). An erratum corrige has been published at http://www.theramblingepicure.com/2011/04/04/erratum-david-downie-and-alison-harris-on-book-tour-from-april-20-to-may-20-in-nyc-and-sf-bay-area/

  • Gregoire Michaud
    April 5, 2011

    It is indeed nice to highlight real bread bakers around France. The same article for bakers around the world trying to inspire and spread the love of good bread would be nice.
    We try to do our part in Hong Kong and it takes a lot of work!

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 5, 2011

      We’re trying to do our part to encourage the renaissance of good bread. How nice to discover a real food French (?) baker in Hong Kong. Jean-Philippe, the author of the article, will be happy to discover you!

      You might be interested in his excellent book, le Dictionnaire Universel du Pain, which came out last October, and does indeed cover bread from around the world.

      I also see you went to EHL hotel management school. We are based in Switzerland, and my daughter will be going to EHL next year.

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    April 5, 2011

    thanks Gregoire, ye I would like to make this kind of enquiry all around the world and try to meet real good artists bakers. tell me more about your own experience, please.

    • Gregoire
      April 5, 2011

      Oh wow! Monsieur de Tonnac himself – what an honor! 🙂

      Bread was my first love and still is today. My second bakery book will be published in July, the first one being sold out. So far, I published 4 books: 2 on bread, 1 on cheese and 1 on dessert. But of course, my books are nothing like your magnificent Dictionnaire!

      I am working in a hotel with two 3 Michelin stars restaurants in Hong Kong (one French and one Chinese) and we are striving to uphold the values of good bread everyday. Our levain was born in 2005 at the same time the hotel opened and we feed our “baby” ever since! We occasionally do bread classes outside the hotel, but it’s too busy to make it on a regular basis.
      My blog has more info: http://gregoiremichaud.com

      We’re a bunch of bread-obsessed bakers – for the art, for the science and for the passion.

      I am a Swiss national but have been working around the world for 13 years – and right now, Hong Kong is home 🙂
      The last time I saw a picture of you it was with Dan Lepard. We’re in contact from time to time…

      Very nice to be in touch with you!

      @Jonell EHL is a good school – good choice 🙂 I come from Verbier, in Valais: le pays de la raclette!

      • Jonell Galloway
        April 5, 2011

        Yes, very nice to be in touch. We all seem to have lots in common. I do believe I took that picture of Jean-Philippe and Dan Lepard at a reception in Paris, in honor of his Dictionnaire. Now if we could only get it translated into English!

        Where can we find your books?

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    April 5, 2011

    Many thanks Gregoire for your message and to share so simply your passion for bread. your journey sounds a real interesting experience, and, like Jonell, i will try to find your books. it should be interesting to know how people in Hong Kong taste crusty bread (pain à croûte), which is so particular in the world. thanks too for your compliments. many things have to be done for bread, and so, we do.
    merci Jonell aussi (pouyr la traduction et le commentaire)

  • Gregoire
    April 6, 2011

    Thanks for both of you replies.

    I will keep you posted when my new bread book comes out 🙂

    All the best and long live real bread!

  • Meeta
    April 7, 2011

    Adore the picture of you with the flowers Jonell! Lovely virtual trip through Geneva’s markets! Thanks!

  • Jonell Galloway
    April 7, 2011

    I’m no photographer, and my dear Nikon is quite sickly these days. Still it’s fun to show what’s available in the market every week. I need some photography lessons from you, the “master”!

  • Catherine Jones
    April 8, 2011

    Love how the brussels sprout comes alive in this poem.

  • Catherine Jones
    April 8, 2011

    Can’t imagine Easter without chocolate rabbits and those foil wrapped chocolate eggs, some which we find weeks after the big day.

  • Catherine Jones
    April 8, 2011

    Each one sounds delightfully delicious and decadent. I made a mint chip martini with creme de menthe and creme de cacao, chocolate bits and cream. You only need a little bit of the mint flavor–it was SO good. Maybe I should call it “After 9.”

  • Lynne Gordon
    April 8, 2011

    Hi beautiful slideshow!

    I especially love the flowers!

    Please do something soon with edible flowers. You have a knack for this!

  • Jonell Galloway
    April 10, 2011

    Thanks Lynne, but they are really generic and ordinary compared to Meeta Khurana Wolff’s!

  • Stephanie Post
    April 11, 2011

    Thanks for posting a link back to my blog! The story of the chocolatini is one of the few she shared about Rock Hudson, who was a lifelong friend of hers up to his death. One of the things that broke my heart the most when she died was that she never gave an interview specifically about her friendship with Rock. So many other stories, like this one, died with her.

    The lady certainly led a full and interesting life.

    • Christina Daub
      April 11, 2011

      Stephanie, you are so welcome. I was delighted to discover your blog when doing the research for this article. While I agree it’s a shame she wasn’t interviewed re: her friendship with Rock Hudson, I always assumed her dedicated and courageous work on the behalf of AIDS victims was inspired by the deep compassion she had for him. Surely others thought this as well….

      By the way Liz’s diaries are going to be published soon, so stay tuned.

  • Rosemary
    April 13, 2011

    I wish I had this kind of talent.

  • Sarah
    April 13, 2011

    Thank you for your insight into Indian-Jewish cuisine, tradition and history, a subject I know little about. Malida sounds so aromatic with the cardamom.Is poha a rice flour?

  • TonyI
    April 14, 2011

    What do you think the likelihood is that it will get published in English as unfortunately my command of the French language doen’t really extend much further than ‘O’level!

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 14, 2011

      Many people in the world of food read French, but it would certainly be a lot easier if it were simply in English, and it would reach a much wider audience. As the world in general grows more interested in good, healthy, innovative bread, perhaps there will be more demand for it in English. In fact, I think there already is, but perhaps publishers simply haven’t discovered the need. I certainly don’t know of any English book that is so thorough as this and so well written.

  • Lana
    April 16, 2011

    Great recap on sandwiches! Growing up in Serbia, I was not exposed to too many varieties – most of our sandwiches were open-faced, because the bread was freshly baked, crusty and sturdy.
    I love reading historical articles on food and its origins. Thanks for educating me:)

    • Rosa
      April 19, 2011

      Thank you! I’m glad you liked my article.

      I’d love to learn more about those Serbian sandwiches. They sound so scrumptious!

  • Maria @ Scandifoodie
    April 16, 2011

    This is fascinating! 🙂 And that sandwich looks absolutely scrumptious!

    • Rosa
      April 19, 2011

      Thank you, Maria! It was indeed.

  • TonyI
    April 16, 2011

    An interesting piece but I do think you recipe is symptomatic of where sandwiches appear to have ended up nowadays. Too many flavours and overly rich fillings all competing with one another with the end result being that the consumer is simply overwhelmed by it all.

    Call me old fashioned but based on a foundation of good bread (not overly thick) a combination of 2 at most 3 flavours provides a far more satisfying experience.

    For example

    Roast beeef and horseradish, Egg mayo and cress, cheese and pickle, and ham and mustard.

    Yes I know these are old school and some would say old fashioned and even boring but they have stood the test of time!

    let the debate begin!

    • Rosa
      April 19, 2011

      Dear Tony,

      Thank you for reading my article and for leaving a comment! I’m glad it made you react.

      I do believe that sandwiches should not be overloaded with too many ingredients, yet I don’t think mine is overly rich. The flavors all blend perfectly well together and counterbalance one another in a harmonious way…

      Of course, I also love the simpler versions as cited by you.

      I guess that if you use good and homemade produces, you can’t go wrong and, at the end, it is a question of personal taste. 😉

      Cheers.

  • Catherine
    April 19, 2011

    Lovely to think of moons in their papery shells.

  • Rosa
    April 19, 2011

    Thank you! I’m glad you liked my article.

    I’d love to learn more about those Serbian sandwiches. They sound so scrumptious!

  • flo makanai
    April 19, 2011

    Je savoure très régulièrement la chance que j’ai de ne pas travailler très loin de l’une de ses boulangeries. Accueil charmant, pains offerts à la dégustation, innovations très intéressantes, pains vraiment gourmands, dont on sent la pousse tranquille mais maitrisée. Définitivement un très grand de la boulange, de la trempe de Mr Poujauran dont le pain aura été une véritable révélation quand j’avais 20 ans : un autre monde de saveurs du pain, de textures, d’arômes, s’ouvre alors à soi… Pure bliss!
    Le seul “défaut” (et encore, entre guillemets) des délicieux et personnels pains de Franck Debieu est que plusieurs sont un peu trop gras à mon goût. Un poil moins d’huile d’olive dans certaines de ses pâtes, et ce serait parfait.
    J’ai souvent eu envie d’aller faire un tour dans les coulisses, il faudrait que je me donne le temps de le faire, un de ces jours…
    Merci Jean-Philippe pour ce beau portrait.

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    April 19, 2011

    merci Florence pour ta contrabution à la gloire du Berger. tu as plus de pratique des pains de Sceaux Fontenay Meudon que j’en ai car j’ai seulement commencé à goûter. j’espère me rattraper en mai car j’y retourne. j’ai lu sur Twiter que tu n’abandonnais pas la partie et c’est une bonne nouvelle.

  • Steve Homer
    April 19, 2011

    Hi Jonell

    Just been sent your link by a contact of mine. I’m a Brit and I run an online food magazine Comida de Almeria (Food of Almeria) in Spain. I love your concept and in fact I have already come up with a similar idea but mine is to be an online magazine called Eat & Drink International – quarterly publication (see http://www.sabordealmeria.com) – I have already started to line up bloggers from around the world, so we have some synergy. I don’t see that we will compete but more compliment. I’d love to find a way to contribute with editorial and/or photography. I also have a blog Food Photographer in Spain (www.foodtog.blogspot.com), but as I run a Spanish & Mediterranean Culinary School here too….my time is limited. I have also lived in a variety of places in Europe and the Middle East and Far East so I have quite a cosmopolitan outlook.

    It would be interesting to hear from you….in the meantime I shall try and put together the information you requested in your blog.

    Best regards

    Steve

  • Françoise
    April 20, 2011

    yaammm, I love this !
    did you ever try to top it with some very cold natural yogurt and a little sugar on top ? And the hall thing on 2 “Zwieback”. My mom’s own recipe.
    Thanks Jonnell for all the good ideas and informations.
    Have a wonderful day. Françoise

  • Simon
    April 21, 2011

    This looks amazing. Now I just need to get the recipe????

  • Marcia
    April 22, 2011

    I found this URL while looking for “gf chemistry”. I have made bread from a box mix (GF Pantry – Favorite Sandwich Bread) very successfully twice and I have failed miserably 3 times. Each time the bread rises fine. It is the cooking that is going wrong. The bread splists itself apart creating a top and bottom and then leaves uncooked spots while the crust becomes too dark. When it cools the bread collapses to 1/2 its “right out of the oven” size. Grrrrr What am I doing wrong? I have tried more water/ less water, lightly beating the room temp eggs/whipping the eggs, adding extra yeast/or not, adding a pinch of baking powder or a bit of cider vinegar, cooking at 375 or 350, etc, etc, etc…
    Any ideas? I am willing to change mixes or even try “from scratch” again. I have been eating GF for 10 years so I am not a complete newbie.

    • Jenn Oliver
      June 6, 2011

      Is it a bread mix you’ve used before? It may not be your fault… or maybe your oven’s temperature has changed – if your temperature is actually higher than you programmed your oven to be I could see issues too – the collapsing afterwards could be due to air escaping since your bread split. Though without knowing exactly what was in your mix it is hard to say, I’m sorry I’m not a very experienced GF bread baker….

  • rebecca
    April 24, 2011

    great tips and love your blog Rebecca

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 24, 2011

      Thanks, Rebecca. I’m so glad you enjoy our work. We’re working hard to put out a good, original “product” that serves the public.

  • Dominique (De vous à moi...)
    April 27, 2011

    Superbe, non seulement ton sandwich te plait, mais en plus je perfectionne mon anglais (qui en a bien besoin!) grâce à ton article. je viens de faire germer des graines (un mélange), j’en mets partout… délicieux!

    • Rosa
      April 28, 2011

      Merci pour ton compliment! Je suis heureuse de pouvoir t’aider à perfectionner ton anglais tout en t’instruisant. 😉

      Les graines germées sont délicieuses, saines et leur utilisation est multiple.

  • Raina
    April 28, 2011

    I love a good sandwich. Yours sounds wonderful…the perfect combination of flavors. I love the choice of a scone with caraway seeds for the bread…yum!

    • Rosa
      April 28, 2011

      Thank you, Raina! I’m glad my sandwich is to your taste. Yes, scones can also be eaten without clotted cream and jam… 😉

  • Ana Powell
    April 28, 2011

    Awesome post Rosa, well done.
    Your work is getting better and better ♥

    • Rosa
      April 28, 2011

      Thank you for the kind words! I’m glad you like my work. 🙂

  • FOODESSA
    April 28, 2011

    Never knew there was so much to be said on sandwiches. Why am I not surprised you have such a sandwich mouthful to say on the subject ;o)

    One of my very favourite meals to put together is based on the very simple sandwich. By that I mean…opening up my fridge and gathering whatever I have on hand that will please my tummy…especially roasted veggies. Great artisanal bread to hold it all together…and my pleasure has been fulfilled.

    Once again Rosa…your dedication to great food serves as a wonderful example.

    Ciao for now and flavourful wishes,
    Claudia

    • Rosa
      May 9, 2011

      Thanks for reading my article and for the kind words!

      I’m glad to hear that you also enjoy gourmet sandwiches made on the spurr of the moment and with whatever you find in your fridge.

  • Magic of Spice
    April 28, 2011

    What a great post! One of my favorite things about sandwiches is that they many times are spur of the moment inventions…Great looking sandwich 🙂

    • Rosa
      May 9, 2011

      Yes, indeed! The possibilities are endless.

      Thanks!

  • Eva
    April 28, 2011

    This was fun to read. I recently got turned on to Vietnamese sandwiches, known as banh mi: http://inthekitchenwitheva-eva.blogspot.com/2011/04/banh-mi.html

    I’m looking forward to making one soon!

    • Rosa
      May 9, 2011

      I’ve heard a lot about Bahn Mi and plan on making that sandwich at home with homemade baguette. 🙂

  • marla
    April 29, 2011

    Rosa, this post is awesome! Out of all these sandwich descriptions – yours would certainly be my first choice. Gorgeous!

    • Rosa
      May 9, 2011

      Thank you, Marla! Great to hear that you like my sandwich. 🙂

  • Louise
    May 3, 2011

    As luck would have it Rosa, tomorrow is National Hoagie Day and this post is simply awesome. What GREAT info. Quite enlightening. And, as for your masterpiece, oh my word!!!

    Thank you so much for sharing…

    • Rosa
      May 9, 2011

      Thank you, Louise! Right on time, indeed… Happy to hear that you liked reading this article and that you found my sandwich appealing.

  • Line
    May 5, 2011

    Pour avoir goûté le pain de Pascal, pour connaître l’homme depuis l’enfance, je ne peux que confirmer tout ce qui est dit ici. Pascal est un artiste du goût. Son pain, ses créations pâtissières, en sont la preuve.
    Merci de lui avoir consacré cet article.

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    May 5, 2011

    merci pour lui Line. ça va lui faire un grand plaisir. les boulangers ont adopté durant des siècles pour des raisons socio-économico-politiques un profil bas. je sais que cette profession en son entier, celle qu’on appelle la “filière blé-farine-pain” est en manque de reconnaissance. à une époque où quelques boulangers font leur boulot et proposent du bon pain, il ne faut pas manquer l’occasion de le leur dire.

  • Catherine Jones
    May 8, 2011

    You’ve inspired me: Bailey’s,kahlua, cream, & shaved dark chocolate.

  • youngandfoodish
    May 8, 2011

    My first Laguiole association is with knives.

  • Jonell Galloway
    May 8, 2011

    Yes, those funny shaped knives. Bras of course has Laguiole knives made especially for him, with MB engraved on them if I remember correctly.

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    May 8, 2011

    Laguiole = buron (small house during mountain summer pasture) | Lou Mazuc | famous knives | famous chef MB | Le Puech du Suquet | famous chef baker PA | famous TRE

  • Maria Luise
    May 8, 2011

    I just noticed this website by accident and Tina Daub’s superb, article, historically well informed and written with gusto, will ensure that from now on I’ll check it out regularly.

    Maria Luisel

  • Catherine Jones
    May 10, 2011

    Chicken ribs as ribs of a cathedral is tremendous!

  • Dsw
    May 11, 2011

    And people I know skim the fat off the soup. Think I’ll send them this poem.

  • Tina
    May 11, 2011

    Thank you Maria Luisel. Look forward to meeting you here.

  • Móna Wise
    May 11, 2011

    Great article Meeta,
    Are you a member of SF in Weimar?
    When I moved back to Galway there were only a few conviviums in Ireland (Dublin and Cork) so the Chef & I started the embers burning in the local Galway convivium and now there are over 100 members. Looking forward to sharing some of all that lovely food with you next week.
    Móna

  • flo makanai
    May 11, 2011

    Excellent article.
    Its content should be taught to each and every kid in school…
    Thanks Rosa.

  • CD
    May 12, 2011

    Bravo. Made me want to book an immediate flight to Paris. Also mentioned zchocolat in http://www.theramblingepicure.com/archives/2157
    Cheers,
    Tina

  • Peter White
    May 15, 2011

    Thank you Esmaa for writing so candidly and forcefully about a subject that must have been painful to you. We all have our skeletons in the closet, but dealing with them openly and honestly and drawing the appropriate conclusions — and applying them in our daily lives, as you seem to have done, both in regard to mindful eating, as well as to mindful living — is never easy, even when we know them to be true.

    • Esmaa-Self
      May 16, 2011

      Thank you Peter. Indeed, dealing with one’s skeleton’s is a life maker or breaker.

  • Rivki Locker (Ordinary Blogger)
    May 17, 2011

    Great strategies. Have you read ‘French Women Don’t get Fat?’ Great book, similar concepts.

  • Janelle Bremer
    May 25, 2011

    This is a great article!

    The best tip I found for baking is to use flour measurements in grams instead of cups. When you do this you can use the same ratios from the original recipe to make your gluten free substitutions.

    • Jenn Oliver
      June 6, 2011

      Yes measuring by weight is critical! Ever since I started measuring by weight I have had much more success converting recipes.

  • Silvia
    May 31, 2011

    Guapa, talentosa, imaginativa, buena cocinera… Qué suerte tiene tu familia de que tenerte.
    Suerte.

    Besos.

  • Silvia
    May 31, 2011

    Wow! Que no te he dicho nada de la receta… No soy de gazpacho ni de salmorejo pero estas piruletas me las comía de dos en dos.

  • working london mummy
    May 31, 2011

    what a great idea for something to serve as an amuse bouche. Now I need to think of people I like enough to serve such amuse bouches

  • Miriam/The Winter Guest
    June 1, 2011

    Congrats, Sandra, on this very amusing recipe!! Ole mi niña…

  • Begoña
    June 1, 2011

    Impresionante!!!!
    Un saludo, Begoña

  • Jenny @ Savour the Senses
    June 1, 2011

    Great photo! I have recently fallen in love with goat cheese. I feel like I am going to be blogging about it quite a bit in the next few weeks!

  • RAquel
    June 2, 2011

    Desde luego hay formas y formas… y paises de segunda y de primera en la UE 🙁 que pena

  • clemenvilla
    June 2, 2011

    El daño ya está hecho, ahora falta que realmente encuentren en dónde está el problema.

    Esperemos que la gente sea más racional de lo que pensamos y vuelva a consumir las frutas y verduras nuestras, aunque lo dudo.

  • Grace Cavalieri
    June 3, 2011

    Beautiful — and I have been hoping someday to find a poem to share with my Chinese acupuncturist!

  • Anne Harding Woodworth
    June 3, 2011

    Like a tea ceremony: simple, graceful, sensual, with meaning deep inside. How beautiful.

  • Patricia Gray
    June 3, 2011

    Oooooooo, how lubricious!

  • Tina
    June 4, 2011

    So sexy!

  • Tina
    June 4, 2011

    This is a gem of a poem.

  • Tina
    June 4, 2011

    Thank you for this loveliness.

  • silvia
    June 4, 2011

    Woooowwww cuanto derroche de imaginación.Son bárbaras.Deben ser deliciosas,una gran receta de nuestra tierra.
    m
    Me alegra que estés aquí,tienes mucho talento.

    Un beso Sandra

  • Teresa
    June 4, 2011

    Im Presionantes¡¡¡¡ Me han encantado, un fuerte abrazo, Teresa

  • Karen Schaar
    June 4, 2011

    I’m going to go make myself a cup of tea right now….
    Thanks for sharing!

  • ED
    June 4, 2011

    Toll.

  • Miriam/The Winter Guest
    June 6, 2011

    Genial recapitulación, será de gran ayuda. Menuda faenita nos han hecho los del Google…

  • cocidodesopa
    June 6, 2011

    Vamos … que entonces todavía queda trabajo por hacer por parte de los de google, ¿no?

    Muchas gracias por la información; mucho curro 🙂

    Besitos

  • yumyumfoodrecipes.com
    June 8, 2011

    Nigel Slater is an English cook and food writer. <———- I just knew this… Thanks for sharing.

  • yumyumfoodrecipes.com
    June 8, 2011

    You have nice articles… LOve it!

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 8, 2011

      Thanks so much. We work very hard to provide good information about food around the world.

  • Maris (In Good Taste)
    June 12, 2011

    Cooking was also a saving grace for me during a hard time in my life. This is a powerful and relevant post for many. Very well said!

    • Rosa
      February 17, 2013

      It definitely helps!

      Thank you. I’m glad you liked this post.

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Miriam/The Winter Guest
    June 15, 2011

    I’m drooling all over my keyboard…

  • ml
    June 19, 2011

    What a wonderfully evocative poem about love and – yes – death.
    I loved the English translation although I’m a native German speaker.

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 21, 2011

      I believe the German translation is lovely too. The poem is truly moving. It runs through my mind over and over, every single day.

  • Chez Loulou
    June 21, 2011

    Deep fried goat cheese??? The expression “gilding the lily” comes to mind. 🙂

  • cocidodesopa
    June 22, 2011

    ¡Cualquiera diría que es una coca! Más originalidad, no puede haber.

    Besitos

  • Ana
    June 23, 2011

    makes me want to eat them!!

  • Dayana
    June 23, 2011

    I thought finding yucca would be so arduous but it is a breeze!

  • Miriam/The Winter Guest
    June 27, 2011

    Pero qué coca más requetemonísima de la muerte!

  • Tina
    June 29, 2011

    “One of the most important resources that a garden makes available for use, is the gardener’s own body. A garden gives the body the dignity of working in its own support. It is a way of rejoining the human race.” — Wendell Berry

  • Adri
    July 3, 2011

    The magic of choux dough, indeed. Oh my, but Nun’s farts! What a glorious name – in Italian we say sfingi, but Nun’s Farts is most surely a superior moniker. What a positively delightful article – and not only because it deals with one of my favorite desserts. This is my first visit to this site. I am a convert. Thanks for a thorougly enjoyable Sunday morning read.

  • Dan
    July 9, 2011

    Hi Jonell,
    Great writing style!!
    I found you guys on twitter and I love the site. Have you every thought of doing any Travel Writing on the side?

    Check us out and let me know if you have some time:

    http://www.thisBOUNDLESSworld.com

    Thanks!!
    D

  • jean
    July 11, 2011

    Cute! I’d love to try these…recipe, please!

  • Melanie
    July 19, 2011

    Lovely and very informative article Rosa. I love your blog too. Your recipes are wonderful and your baking rocks. I told my boyfriend about how you manage to bake in your tiny kitchen. He has a similar space restraint and was encouraged by you.

  • arun
    July 23, 2011

    really tats helpful ya !. i planned to start a new recipe site. u ve saved my time. i ll use the plugin u referred here for wp. but i ve one doubt, does getting indexed in google recipes will bring more traffic? i’m following this comment. so pls reply

    • sandeea
      July 23, 2011

      This article was written from an spanish point of view. In Spain google recipe search is not working yet. So i have not noticed any traffic increase. But if your site is in the US you will probably receive more visits

  • Warren Bobrow
    July 28, 2011

    She was the Anais Nin of her generation. I bet as she grew older there was always a certain glimmer in her eye.

  • Leonor
    July 28, 2011

    This looks delicious. Have you made it yet?

  • Natalie@Deconstructing The Home
    August 2, 2011

    Seeing this makes me want to go back to Paris. Everything there, including the food, is so detailed. Your pictures are beautiful. Thanks for sharing!

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 2, 2011

      I’m glad you enjoyed my Paris experience in photos!

  • Deeba Rajpal (@vindee)
    August 8, 2011

    Must try this. Sounds wonderful & refreshing. I make quark regularly, and this mousse sounds delicious!

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 8, 2011

      I’m impressed that you make quark! Yes, this is healthier than a classic French mousse, and works with almost any fruit.

  • Johan Peijnenburg
    August 9, 2011

    Great images and definitely going to try that recipe!

  • Lovi
    August 11, 2011

    Merci pour ce bel article, très intéressant et qui nous met l’eau à la bouche ! Un détail : la baguette française et son fameux croustillant inimitable est goûtée et appréciée dans le monde entier ! Sous toutes les latitudes!

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    August 11, 2011

    merci de vos mots. pour le croustillant, je ne suis pas certain. c’est le génie boulanger latin qui a concçu cette dialectique subtile du tendre et du craquant, de la mie et de la croûte ; mais cette dualité fait problème chez beaucoup de nos semblables panivores à travers le monde. ce qui fait que les boulangers français qui s’installent à l’étranger tempèrent bien souvent leur recette en ajoutant à leur pâte de la matière grasse ou du sucre. je crois que c’est l’idée du croustillant qui plaît plus que le croustillant lui-même.

  • Jim Chevallier
    August 14, 2011

    “…If I bear burdens
    they begin to be remembered
    as gifts, goods, a basket
    of bread that hurts
    my shoulders but closes me
    in fragrance. I can
    eat as I go. ”

    from Stepping Westward
    by Denise Levertov

  • Miriam/The Winter Guest
    August 15, 2011

    Me encanta, y cuánta razón tienes, los niños piensan que todo crece en una lata o en brik… es pá llorar. La mantequilla casera está deliciosa, incluso la hecha con nata líquida de lo más corriente. Besos!

  • sandeea
    August 15, 2011

    muchas gracias Miriam! Este es el experimento del que te hablaba el otro día, ya sabía que te iba a gustar. Yo desde luego he disfrutado como una niña preparándolo 🙂

  • kako
    August 15, 2011

    Sería también bueno saber cuanto tiempo dura??, yo creo que menos que la que se compra?, una receta sencilla y fácil
    Gracias!

    • sandeea
      August 16, 2011

      Dura poco, de 3 a 5 días en frigorífico, es la pega que tiene ..

  • CD
    August 15, 2011

    Happy Birthday Julia!!!

  • cocidodesopa
    August 16, 2011

    Hombre, con la thermomix no es tan divertido hacer mantequilla, pero menos cansado sí. Pones la música, la maquinita a funcionar, coges las maracas y a bailar, je je.

    • sandeea
      August 16, 2011

      pues mira tú, con la THX nunca he probado… gracias 🙂

  • Deb
    August 18, 2011

    Enjoyed the history of chard. I always wondered about the name “Swiss chard”. Informative and concise, thanks for sharing.

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 18, 2011

      I’m so glad you enjoyed it. It’s always nice to have a little history about what we eat. I find it gives it a different dimension when one knows where it came from.

  • Sanjeeta kk
    August 18, 2011

    Wow..such a simple yet so healthy and flavorful salad, Jonell! Love the freshness of veggies and herbs in it.

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 18, 2011

      Thanks, Sanjeeta. It’s a great summer dish.

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 3, 2011

      It’s almost like a Western version of cucumber raita!

      • Allishe
        December 14, 2012

        I could add:1) Food porn: cooking food just to take picrtues of it and upload them on Flickr2) Prebiotics (inulin, FOS )3) Quick Response Code and Tracking Code that deliver information via cellphone4) Mood food (for exemple Jones Soda with pharma gaba)5) Gluten free diet even for people that don’t have celiac disease6) Caramel + salt (Salted Caramel Signature Hot Chocolate by Starbucks)Too bad stevia has been prohibited here in Europe

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 3, 2011

      It’s rather like a Western version of cucumber raita!

  • alan ireland
    August 24, 2011

    Could not complete sign up for newsletter in above right subset. Looking forward to mail, thanx.

  • Sanjeeta kk
    September 5, 2011

    I am humbled & honored to be listed here, Jonell! Thanks for all the blog love. Awesome links..love to travel, and the links above would be a great help.

  • Camille
    September 12, 2011

    Hello Jonell. I’d love to talk about a photo exhibit. Please contact me at myfudo@gmail.com.
    Cheers!

  • camille
    September 12, 2011

    Hello Jonell. I’d love to talk with you about a photo exhibit. Please contact me at myfudo@gmail.com.

    Cheers!

  • Barbara | Creative Culinary
    September 13, 2011

    Thank you for including my post regarding mashed potatoes! Great lists!

  • Jaime
    September 14, 2011

    Hello,

    My name is Jaime and I represent the Center for Wine Origins. We are compiling a list of media clips and are interested in the circulation of your online publication. May we get a number to show in our documents next to your publication?
    Asap if possible

    Thank you,

    Jaime

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 19, 2011

      Please contact me using the blue Contact Us button at the top of the home page and give a little for detail. Of course, we’d be interested!

  • Sneh | Cook Republic
    September 14, 2011

    Thank you for the feature Jonell! Much appreciated 🙂

  • Vie
    September 17, 2011

    Rosa,

    This article has really inspired and soothed me. I am a student at university with very little income and have just recently started a blog about being healthy on a budget. People think improving your health with low income is tough but I agree with you – it can be exciting and fun, you just have to be playful and open-minded! I was struggling to articulate the best ways to save money without sounding preachy, but your article says everything I wanted to say beautifully. I loved this so much that I intend to post a link to this article on my next blog post.

    Thanks for sharing!

    Vie

  • Fred Schroeder
    September 21, 2011

    The poem beautifully captures the moment when he and she interact over the artichokes, his attention wandering from her to musings on the ancient history of the plant, and her attention wandering from him to disecting the beast. I like it!

    The poem has me thinking of food ….

    Maybe if she had followed this recipe, they could have focused more on one another: http://www.grouprecipes.com/80773/fresh-artichoke-bisque.html

    Then there is Cynar, a curious way to consume artichokes with hardly any trouble at all.

    I can’t resist copying some artichoke facts from the web:

    “Native to the Mediterranean region, the artichoke is the edible flower bud of a thistle-like plant in the sunflower family. It is eaten as a vegetable.

    Its botanical name, Cynara scolymus, derives from the Latin canina meaning canine and the Greek skolymos meaning thistle. Its English name comes from the Arabic al-khurshuf also meaning thistle, which became articiocco in Italian, and ultimately artichoke.

    Although mankind has been eating artichokes for more than 3000 years, the fall of Rome plunged the artichoke into obscurity until its revival in Italy the mid-15th century.

    Catherine de Medici, who was married to King Henry II of France at the tender young age of 14, is credited with bringing the artichoke from her native Italy to France, where its success was instant.

    The artichoke quickly made its way to Britain and as a result, the term artichoke first appeared in written English records in the 15th century. It made its way to America via French and Italian explorers.

    Now California produces 100 percent of the U.S. commercial artichoke crop, rivaled in popularity only in France and Italy. “

    • CD
      September 24, 2011

      Carciofi per tutti!
      Thanks for adding some food history.
      Anyone try the recipe yet?

      • Jonell Galloway
        September 28, 2011

        I enjoyed a bit of food history too. A lovely poem indeed.

      • Jonell Galloway
        October 2, 2011

        I too love the food history. It adds something to the poem, prepares for a good read.

  • Fred Schroeder
    September 21, 2011

    The poem beautifully captures the moment when he and she interact over the artichokes, his attention wandering from her to musings on the ancient history of the plant, and her attention wandering from him to disecting the beast. I like it!

    The poem has me thinking of food ….

    Maybe if she had followed this recipe, they could have focused more on one another: http://www.grouprecipes.com/80773/fresh-artichoke-bisque.html

    Then there is Cynar, a curious way to consume artichokes with hardly any trouble at all.

    I can’t resist copying some artichoke facts from the web:

    “Native to the Mediterranean region, the artichoke is the edible flower bud of a thistle-like plant in the sunflower family. It is eaten as a vegetable. Its botanical name, Cynara scolymus, derives from the Latin canina meaning canine and the Greek skolymos meaning thistle. Its English name comes from the Arabic al-khurshuf also meaning thistle, which became articiocco in Italian, and ultimately artichoke. Although mankind has been eating artichokes for more than 3000 years, the fall of Rome plunged the artichoke into obscurity until its revival in Italy the mid-15th century. Catherine de Medici, who was married to King Henry II of France at the tender young age of 14, is credited with bringing the artichoke from her native Italy to France, where its success was instant. The artichoke quickly made its way to Britain and as a result, the term artichoke first appeared in written English records in the 15th century. It made its way to America via French and Italian explorers. Now California produces 100 percent of the U.S. commercial artichoke crop, rivaled in popularity only in France and Italy. “

  • Jonell Galloway
    September 21, 2011

    Lovely image!

  • Grace Cavalieri
    September 21, 2011

    Will Henry, the brilliant Pulitzer Prize winner be remembered by this sensual and evocative poem? Or his equestrian poems? Or maybe the ultimate: a new poem, eating an artichoke while making a “flying change” on horseback.Now that would be a perfect balance of the art.

  • Rosa
    September 26, 2011

    A beautiful post and recipe!

    At school I struggled to write essays, hated that activity and always failed. Now, I write articles for my blog as well as for TRE and have a lot of fun doing so. I guess the reason why, nowadays, I love putting words down on paper is that the subject is to my taste, so it inspires me.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 28, 2011

      You have found your true voice, and it is so endearing. Plus, you’re a great recipe developer.

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 28, 2011

      But now you’ve found your voice!

  • Jenn
    September 27, 2011

    Absolutely lovely, Jamie. And likewise, though food is also my obsession, through it, I found my passions. Love your writing 🙂

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 28, 2011

      Well said, Jenn. Jamie really has found her voice, plus her recipes are spectacular!

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 2, 2011

      Jamie never fails to please!

  • Jonell Galloway
    October 3, 2011

    I love the way Simon’s short quotes end up not only as quotes, but odd little bits of history and literature we might never have known otherwise.

  • verO
    October 3, 2011

    Bonjour Jonell
    Je me permets de vous écrire en français. En anglais, je me débrouille mieux en lecture qu’en écriture.
    Je suis très flattée que vous ayez choisi ma recette de cuchaule pour votre article.
    Celà m’aura permis de découvrir votre site. Votre approche de la nourriture et de ses dérivés me correspond totalement. Et de plus, vous postez de Suisse. Celà est très intéressant.
    Donc, beaucoup de lecture à rattraper.
    Au plaisir de vous relire.
    verO

  • verO
    October 3, 2011

    Bonjour Jonell
    Je me permts de vous écrire en français. Je me débrouille bien lecture mais l’écriture me donne plus de fil à retordre.
    Je suis très flattée que ma recette ait retenue votre attention.
    Ce qui par la même occasion me permet de découvrir votre site dont l’approche culinaire me correspond bien.
    Donc, beaucoup de lecture à rattrapper.
    Au plaisir de vous relire.
    verO

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 3, 2011

      Je vous ai écrit il y a quelques temps mais je pense que mon mail a dû tomber dans la boîtes des indésirables !

      Je suis contente que vous aimez notre site. J’espère qu’on pourrait continuer à collaborer.

      Jonell

  • Jonell Galloway
    October 5, 2011

    A good start for cutting your food budget and still eating healthily. The tips are extremely common sense and do-able.

  • Mónica Pinto
    October 6, 2011

    Thanks, is great to be here Jonell!

  • Jonell Galloway
    October 6, 2011

    You deserve mention at international level for your dedicated work, and especially those beautiful photos!

  • verO
    October 7, 2011

    J’ai découvert ces biscuits lors d’un séjour aux USA. Ce qui m’a le plus intrigué, c’est leur couleur. Presque noire. Ce qui n’est pas du tout courant en Europe.
    Maintenant, on en trouve également en Suisse, à la Coop ainsi qu’à la Migros sous un autre nom.
    Bonne soirée
    verO

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 10, 2011

      Tu as vu notre article sur l’histoire de l’empreinte sur les Oreos ?

  • CD
    October 19, 2011

    Mmmm…now go read A.E. Stallings brilliant poem about olives on the Food Poetry pages here.

  • Sofie Dittmann
    October 25, 2011

    When we moved to the US, I was flabberghasted not being able to find game on the menu at ANY restaurant we visited… Until it dawned on me that everybody hunts, and a couple of people I know regard venison as something from the past they would not dream of touching.

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 26, 2011

      So true. I wonder if Americans don’t relate game to the pioneer days, so only poor people who don’t have money to buy ribeye and prime rib end up eating the game they kill. They don’t know what they’re missing!

  • Mary
    October 27, 2011

    Jonell, this is my first visit to your blog, so I took some extra time to browse through your earlier posts. I’m so glad I did that. You’ve create a wonderfully informative spot for your readers to visit and I really enjoyed the time I spent here. I’ll definitely be back. I hope you have a great day. Blessings…Mary

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 27, 2011

      I am so moved by your kind words, Mary. We work very hard to provide good, practical information, so I can’t tell you how much it means to me to know that someone truly recognizes our hard work and passion. Now I’m going to take a look at your blog! Blessings, Jonell

  • Kadri
    October 30, 2011

    Jonell, you have a really nice blog, It is so nice to find some other food bloggers in Switzerland 😛

  • Robert Hagedorn
    October 31, 2011

    Saint Augustine couldn’t do it, but can someone else explain what kind of fruit Adam and Eve ate in the story? This may sound silly, but after 6000+ years we deserve an intelligent explanation. No guesses, opinions, or beliefs, please. Just the facts that we know from the story. Treat the whole thing as a challenge. But first, do a quick Internet search: First Scandal.

  • michaelthebaker
    November 1, 2011

    bonjour. Excuse my absence of french. Is there any date set for the publication of your book in english?
    I am working on a book and tv series on the history of sacramental bread. What do you know of the present existence of pain benit?
    many thanks
    Honey in the hearth

    • Jonell Galloway
      November 1, 2011

      I’ll alert Jean-Philippe of your message and let him reply. He’s more qualified than I.

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    November 1, 2011

    Hello Michael, first, do you read french?

  • Jean-Philippe de Tonnac
    November 1, 2011

    It sounds not. your question is about the “pain bénit” nowadays? true? there is a long and brillant article in the dictionary about the topic, but more or less the author (Dominique Salini, University of Corte, Corsica) writes about ancient practive of ‘pain bénit’ in the past in France and in Corsica.

  • Barbara Cacao
    November 7, 2011

    Rosa,
    your Sachertorte looks so juicy and the glazing looks so much more shiny and ‘runny’ than with most Sachertorten! Actually, if I had to choose cakes from my home town Vienna, I would always go for Dobostorte, Imperialtorte, Eszterhazytorte or a Punschkrapfen as they have more varied ingredients and layers (maybe because I’m female?) But I may try Rick’s recipe from the Sacher Backbuch, does this differ from the original?
    Barbara

  • Rosa
    November 7, 2011

    Dear Barbara,

    Thank you for the comment and kind words.

    Well, the Sachertorte that are sold in Vienna generally have a solid chocolate glaze, but Rick’s version is somehow gooey.

    Yes, the cakes you mentioned are more complex in flavor and elaborate, yet Sachertorte, in its apparent simplicity, is far from being bland.

    I really recommend you to try this recipe as it is foolproof and Rick Rodgers creations are always exceptional. This Sachertorte is no exception.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • Mary
    November 8, 2011

    I am new to your blog, so I’ve taken some time to browse through your earlier posts. I’m so glad I did that. You share some great information with your readers and I’ll definitely be back. I hope you have a good day. Blessings…Mary

  • Atria
    November 9, 2011

    Thanks to Oreo I’ve discovered your site, is gorgeous!
    I also written article about oreo history and I’ve read that emblem is somehow connected with Maltan Cross and Christianity.

    Here is my post (it is in Polish, but google translator attached). Maybe you will find it interesting:

    http://ziolowyzakatek.com.pl/2011/11/ciasteczka-oreo-historia/

    • Jonell Galloway
      November 9, 2011

      How interesting! We should translate it into English and post it on The Rambling Epicure!

      Thank you for liking our site. We work hard to publish good information.

      Be well.

  • abdeu
    November 11, 2011

    I tried translating this into French:
    One of the simplest sandwiches one can make is a cheese sandwich. A cheese sandwich does along great with tomato soup or milk. To make my version of a cheese sandwich, you must first have two pieces of white bread, 4 slices of cheese, a frying pan, a spatula and butter. First, place two slices of cheese in between the slices of bread. Next warm up the frying pan and put you desired amount of butter on it (the more butter you put on the pan, the better your sandwich will taste). Next, put a slice of cheese on the top of the sandwich and flip the sandwich facedown on the pan and press down on the sandwich until the cheese at the bottom of the sandwich is golden brown and sticks to the break. Then, put another slice of cheese on the other side of the sandwich and flip the sandwich over with a spatula. After the cheese inside the sandwich has melted, and the cheese on both sides of the sandwich has turned golden brown, you are done. I have only tried this recipe with American cheese, I do not know how it will taste with another kind of cheese, but you are free to experiment.

    This is what I got:
    Un des plus simples sandwiches on peut faire est un sandwich au fromage. Un sandwich au fromage ne le long grande avec la soupe aux tomates ou de lait. Pour ma version d’un sandwich au fromage, vous devez d’abord avoir deux morceaux de pain blanc, 4 tranches de fromage, un poêle, une spatule et le beurre. Tout d’abord, placer deux tranches de fromage entre les tranches de pain. Suivant chauffer la poêle et mettez-vous la quantité désirée de beurre sur celle-ci (plus de beurre que vous mettre sur le plateau, le meilleur de votre sandwich goût). Ensuite, mettre une tranche de fromage sur le dessus du sandwich et flip face vers le bas sandwich sur le plateau et appuyez sur le sandwich jusqu’à ce que le fromage au fond du sandwich soit doré et colle à la pause. Ensuite, mettez une autre tranche de fromage de l’autre côté du sandwich et retourner le sandwich avec une spatule. Après le fromage dans le sandwich a fondu et le fromage sur les deux côtés du sandwich a tourné un brun doré, vous avez terminé. Seulement essayé cette recette avec du fromage américain, je ne sais pas comment il va goûter à une autre sorte de fromage, mais vous êtes libre d’expérimenter.

    Could someone please go over the French translation and correct any grammatical or other errors?

    MERCI!!!!!!!

  • Sofie Dittmann AKA The German Foodie
    November 15, 2011

    I LOVE making layered cakes, but only German-style ones. German baking is not very, ummm, gaudy or pompous – most of it is in the taste of things.

    • Jonell Galloway
      November 16, 2011

      I’d love to share some of your recipes, Sofie.

  • Kristiane Ravn Frost
    November 21, 2011

    Be ware!
    I just want to tell you that we received a similar letter from Tanpani and began negotiating with him about a group coming to our place. It turned out that creditcards were owned by other people and it all was about getting us to get money out of the creditcards and then transfer it to an “agent”.

    • Jonell Galloway
      November 23, 2011

      My husband ran a bank in Nigeria for 4 years, so we figured it out pretty quickly, but he has a different angle than others. If you Google him, you can find other cases, but thanks for forewarning us.

  • Auntie Sofia
    November 21, 2011

    Hello! I was just reading about this bread yesterday and discussing it with my guy who is from Crete. This is a really difficult but really yummy bread to make and its main ingredient is chickpea flour.

    Many people (me included up to yesterday) think that Eftazymo comes from the Greek words Efta (=seven) and zymi (dough), meaning something that has been kneaded or risen seven times. Apparently that’s not the case – even though mothers and grandmothers insist it is 🙂

    In Crete it’s called ftazymo – and this is thought to be an alteration of the word aftozymo (i.e. auto-dough). This is because it is baked without sourdough (which would be the normal way in times past) and the chickpea flour helps it to rise. It seems as if it rises on its own accord, automatically, hence ftazymo – eftazymo.

    Cursed or not it remains one of the best Greek breads ever!

    • Jonell Galloway
      November 22, 2011

      How interesting. You could be a bread historian!

    • Jonell Galloway
      November 23, 2011

      Jean-Philippe says:

      ça y est tu es plus savante que moi en pain. oui intéressant. j’ai pourtant rencontrée des femmes en Grèce qui expliquait qu’elle procédaient ainsi se levant sept fois ou agissant sept fois et dans la mesure où ces femmes le font il faut nécessairement que eptazymo véhicule aussi cette pratique-là. mais, comme on sait, le problème des traditions egt de leur authenticité est un rivière avec tous ses méandres. Would you like me to translate it for you? Check out his wonderful Dictionnaire Universel du Pain pubished in French at Laffont Bouquins.

  • Leonor
    November 23, 2011

    Can’ t wait to try this cranberry-orange relish sauce with my Turkey this Thanksgiving.

    • Jonell Galloway
      November 24, 2011

      It’s a no-fail recipe. Just make sure and use fresh (vs. frozen) cranberries.

  • Sofie Dittmann AKA The German Foodie
    November 26, 2011

    It’s not just that we tend to conserve more, it’s also one of the few “traditional” meals left in this country. And one where you can easily procure the ingredients locally, if you choose to make that effort. 🙂

  • Kerrin @ MyKugelhopf
    November 26, 2011

    an emphasis on sweets, yes yes, but of course, as always ! 🙂 thank you for sharing this. very exciting indeed to have the slow food market in switzerland for the first time. next up for the first time in switzerland…. the salon du chocolat !! hope you’ll be at both events in 2012, jonell.

    • Jonell Galloway
      November 30, 2011

      Good things are happening in the food world in Switzerland!

  • Lora
    December 1, 2011

    Tamar – Yum – the picture of the smoothie with fruit looks so good! Smoothies are so good and I love the fact that you can experiment so much with the varieties of fruit, yogurt, milk, kefir, and even vegetables. The Ninja 1100 Blender is a great choice if you are looking for a blender for making super smoothies.

  • The Wimpy Vegetarian
    December 3, 2011

    This looks so beautiful and simple. I just love it. And it looks like the perfect(ly) healthy salad I’m craving right now!

    • Jonell Galloway
      December 15, 2011

      It’s true the photos make your mouth water!

    • Jonell Galloway
      December 15, 2011

      It’s true the photos and the descriptions of the flavors make your mouth water!

    • renu
      December 15, 2011

      Thanks for the comment! I hope you have a chance to make it.
      Happy Holidays!

  • Lynne
    December 14, 2011

    Great article on Rosa’s superb black and white food photography!

    • Jonell Galloway
      December 15, 2011

      We love it too!

    • Rosa
      December 15, 2011

      Thank you, Lynne! I’m glad you like them.

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Sofie Dittmann/The German Foodie
    December 14, 2011

    I LOVE B&W photography, and these look wonderful. Thanks for sharing!

    • Jonell Galloway
      December 15, 2011

      It’s almost like a different art form, don’t you think? I love it too, and I think it works even for food, which we associate so much with color: red apples, green broccoli, yellow cheese, etc.

    • Rosa
      December 15, 2011

      Thank you, Sofie! B&W photography adds a little “je-ne-sais-quoi” to the subject photographed. It is much more atmospheric…

      Cheers,

      Rosa

      • Stepan
        February 3, 2013

        I would like to express tnahks to this writer for rescuing me from this type of predicament. Just after surfing around through the search engines and seeing thoughts that were not powerful, I assumed my entire life was over. Being alive minus the approaches to the issues you’ve sorted out by means of your entire review is a critical case, as well as the ones that might have in a negative way affected my career if I had not encountered your website. Your expertise and kindness in maneuvering a lot of stuff was crucial. I am not sure what I would have done if I hadn’t encountered such a step like this. I can now relish my future. Thanks so much for the skilled and result oriented help. I won’t hesitate to propose your blog to anybody who desires care about this matter.

  • Kiran @ KiranTarun.com
    December 14, 2011

    I’ve been a huge fan of Rosa’s photography. She has a seriously wonderful photography skills 🙂

    • Jonell Galloway
      December 15, 2011

      I’m certainly a fan. She works hard to improve both her writing and photography skills.

    • Rosa
      December 15, 2011

      Thank you for the compliment, Kiran! *blush*

      Yes, it is a lot of hard work…

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • bellini
    December 15, 2011

    I have been admiring Rosa’s work!!

    • Jonell Galloway
      December 15, 2011

      Yes, it is beautiful. She gets better every day.

    • Rosa
      December 15, 2011

      Thank you, bellini! 🙂

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Sofie Dittmann/The German Foodie
    December 15, 2011

    I heard that on NPR yesterday. It is amazing to me how many (fraudulent) labels for OLIVE OIL there are…!

  • Sofie Dittmann
    December 15, 2011

    It’s like w/ humans – don’t eat when you’re not hungry. 🙂

  • Sofie Dittmann/The German Foodie
    December 15, 2011

    I know a few people who have multiple food issues, not just a gluten intolerance. It’s probably one of the hardest ones in this culture, b/c so many thing have wheat in it!

  • Rosa
    December 15, 2011

    A very interesting article, even if I’n not gluten intolerant.

    Cheers,

    Rosa

  • Renu
    December 16, 2011

    Thanks for the comment! Hope you have a chance to make it.

  • Sanjeeta kk
    December 16, 2011

    Thanks for the feature, Jonell!

  • Lisa
    December 16, 2011

    Great article, Jenn! I just sent this to three GF friends, and of course I’m bookmarking it for myself. Knowledge is key when baking or cooking Gluten-Free ;D

  • Carrie Province
    December 16, 2011

    I love the tomato picture!! Such a beautiful shot!

  • Carrie Province
    December 16, 2011

    I love the tomato picture! Such a beautiful shot!

  • pami sami
    December 18, 2011

    Amazing! I love your recipes! As a kid, I used to eat the fruits just plain and fresh, directly from the tree/ bush! mnhami

    • Jonell Galloway
      December 20, 2011

      I’d love to try them. We don’t have them in Switzerland.

      I’m glad you love our recipes. We work very hard to provide interesting, original recipes that are not too time-consuming, i.e. for modern people on the go!

  • Kavi
    December 18, 2011

    thank god for google translate! 🙂 Absolutely delicious recipe!

    Would love to include it in my event. If possible, please go through the rules of my event Jingle All The Way and link your post there.
    Thanks!
    Kavi
    (Edible Entertainment)
    Ongoing events:
    Jingle All The Way &
    Microwave Easy Cooking
    Have a great day!

  • Sofie Dittmann
    December 20, 2011

    I LOVE latkes. Germans call them Kartoffelpuffer, we’ve always eaten them w/ apple sauce. MMmmmmmhhhh

    • Jonell Galloway
      December 22, 2011

      Doesn’t EVERYBODY love latkes? Real comfort food!

  • Jean Fain
    December 23, 2011

    I’m honored to be included in your holiday gift-giving article. The Self-Compassion Diet actually makes a special present to yourself any day of the year. As a gift to a friend or loved one, well, it’s a fine gift to those who are already somewhat self-compassionate. For someone sorely lacking in self-compassion, it’s possible that the recipient would take it the wrong way. More specifically, as if you’d written in the card: “Thinking of you and how much weight you need to lose!” In short, think before you gift! And happy holidays!!
    Jean Fain

  • Jean Fain
    December 23, 2011

    I’m honored to be featured in your holiday gift round-up. While “The Self-Compassion Diet” makes a special present to yourself any day of the year, think twice before giving it to a friend or a loved one. The last thing you want is for the recipient to react as if you’d written in the card: “Thinking of you and how much weight you need to lose!” I’ll be giving it to special friends and relatives who are already somewhat self-compassionate, but not those sorely lacking. Happy holidays!
    Jean Fain

  • bella
    January 7, 2012

    great recipe but it’s a pity, surely, to put the fried tomatoes into boiling water; they are best added right at the end.

    • Jonell Galloway
      January 9, 2012

      David is away, and I’m not really qualified to answer your question, but I’ll certainly pop the question when he returns. Thanks for your input!

  • Paul Cooper
    January 17, 2012

    We will be staying around Aigle the week of the 11 Feb 2012…I was wondering if there might be any local cooking classes we (two couples) could take…any advice

    cheers

    Paul

    • Jonell Galloway
      January 19, 2012

      I sometimes give classes in our chalet in Villars-sur-Ollon, just up the mountain from Aigle. What type of classes would you be looking for and for how long at a time, how many days, etc.? I could also organize a wine class/tour of the region.

  • linda kaufman
    February 1, 2012

    Re: post 31/01 Ferran Adrià: La Fundación El Bulli will be a “Wikipedia” of haute cuisine.
    There is a problem with the link: Informe21
    Is there another way to find this information ?
    Thank you.

  • linda kaufman
    February 1, 2012

    RE: Ferran Adrià: La Fundación El Bulli will be a “Wikipedia” of haute cuisine
    There is a problem with the link Informe21
    Can you advise ?
    Thank you.

    • Jonell Galloway
      February 2, 2012

      Thanks for telling me. I’ll check it immediately. It’s in Spanish.

  • Ledia Runnels
    February 8, 2012

    Thank you for the ping back on my article, “How to Write Haiku: In a Nutshell”.

  • Qtypie
    February 8, 2012

    Liked the article. One thing – you talk about deep-dish quiches, and the 9 inch pie dish recipe you give _is_ deep-dish compared to the 1970’s parisian variant you describe. However, you don’t talk about _really_ deep-dish quiche, which requires something deeper than your standard 9 inch pie pan. My wife and I made the 9 inch pie variant (with about 4 eggs) for years. Recently, we got a deeper dish, and started making quiches with 6-8 eggs (still about 9 inch diameter), and the resulting quiches, in our opinion, just blow away the less deep-dish versions. Also, we found that feeding a family of four with growing teens in the mix was tough with a standard pie pan quiche, but with the deep dish version, no problems. Leftovers, even.

    It would be nice if you could do a follow on article about the differences in characteristics of the different depths, because I think there is a huge difference. It’s almost a different dish altogether.

    • Jonell Galloway
      February 16, 2012

      Depth is indeed an issue. I like mine thin and bit puffed up like a real quiche Lorraine.

      Alice’s article motivated to make a quiche, and since I hadn’t made one in years, I forget to add either milk of cream. It was think but divine. Sometimes mistakes lead to great discoveries.

      Anybody else out there have a preference for thick or thin quiche?

  • rose sucree
    February 8, 2012

    where are the recipes?

    • Jonell Galloway
      February 9, 2012

      We do not post recipes with the food art, but we have a multitude of recipes under Eating, Recipes.

    • Jonell Galloway
      February 14, 2012

      Go to the tab/category Eating, and they’re all listed under Recipes (sub-categories listed in alphabetical order). Enjoy!

  • Rose
    February 8, 2012

    looks yummy, are there any recipes?

  • Jo
    February 11, 2012

    I have loved Bobbie’s pics forever. Each pic tells it’s own story.

  • dave cronen
    February 16, 2012

    Hey Ms . J tak a look @ the web site above

  • danielstroppa
    February 16, 2012

    Nice lecture. I totally agree with the conclusion “And so it seems that pizza will remain pizza, focaccia will remain focaccia, and they will continue to be sold alongside one another for a long, long time as they always have.”

    PS: I actually ate the best focaccia di Recco in… Camogli (village next to Recco on the coast). On the seaside of the beautiful small fishing port. Just fantastic.

  • danielstroppa
    February 16, 2012

    Nice lecture. I totally agree with the conclusion “And so it seems that pizza will remain pizza, focaccia will remain focaccia, and they will continue to be sold alongside one another for a long, long time as they always have.”

    PS: I actually ate the best Focaccia di Recco in… Camogli (village next to Recco on the coast). On the seaside of the beautiful little fishing port. Fantastic.

  • Anthony
    February 16, 2012

    There’s about 8 different kinds of Bitter Truth bitters; I presume you mean Aromatic.

  • Carol Jenkins
    February 21, 2012

    I am waiting for Part 3! I love the pictures and the stories, as I am about most of your writing, David!

  • Brian Cool
    February 21, 2012

    In his (her) case, Eliot has only one ‘l’.
    Looks odd, but then so did she (he).
    Brilliant novelist however you spell it.
    B. Cool

    • Jonell Galloway
      February 22, 2012

      Of course it only has one “l”. I truly don’t know how that one got past me. Thanks so much for correcting us!

  • Alice Dale
    February 27, 2012

    I would like to talk with Ms. Tiberghien about how best to improve my 16-year old son’s writing skills. He is a student at the International School here in Geneva. Do you offer some limited tutoring?

    • Jonell Galloway
      February 27, 2012

      I do indeed offer coaching. I’ll send you an e-mail. Thanks!

    • Jonell Galloway
      February 28, 2012

      I’ll pass your message on to Susan as well.

  • Sofie Dittmann @thegermanfoodie
    February 27, 2012

    Cool article! Thanks for sharing!

  • Sean
    February 28, 2012

    Sounds like an awesome and delicious trip!

    • Diana Zahuranec
      February 29, 2012

      It was! Alto Adige is such a surprise – really good region to visit.

  • natasha
    March 15, 2012

    Hey

    I love the picture of the fruit and vegetable stand with the words “pizzo” at top. I was wondering if I may get permission to use it for wall art and decoration at The Plaza Food Hall.

    please email me at intern@eladgroup.com

    thank you

    Natasha

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 16, 2012

      Can you please tell me which article you’re referring to, or give me the URL. We usually use our own photos, Creative Commons photos, photos from photo stock, or photos for which the photographers have given us full permission. If there is a watermark, you would probably have to request authorization from the photographer himself.

  • Jill
    March 18, 2012

    Wow you made your own cheese! Very impressive. So, did it taste like dirty laundry?

    • Diana Zahuranec
      March 20, 2012

      Ha, no, not this time. And I’m pretty sure we never used that in UNISG cheese-tasting class, either, thank goodness.

  • Bill
    March 19, 2012

    Smells…”animal-like” and with “a definite hay scent”? Thanks, but I may just continue to purchase from the shelf rather than try to make it myself. The recipe, via the included link, seems a little daunting to me, but it must have been fun making it just the same!

    • Diana Zahuranec
      March 20, 2012

      I admit it doesn’t sound tasty, but “animal-like” and “hay” (along with a lot of other weird terms) are actually two scent and flavor descriptors used for cheese!

  • Jenn
    March 19, 2012

    Yay, congrats!!!

  • Rosa
    March 19, 2012

    Congratulations! 🙂

  • Sarah
    March 20, 2012

    Wonderful history lesson of the world’s prettiest cookie, a bit complicated to make but well worth the effort.

  • Elatia Harris
    March 21, 2012

    Simon, you have made me feel much better about eating while standing at an open fridge, which I unofficially do when the fur truly flies. About 20 years ago, there was a marvelous show at the Cooper-Hewitt Museum, “Now I Lay Me Down to Eat” — an examination of cultures of the ancient Mediterranean in which diners reclined on couches the better to to eat, and dined off gueridons and trays.

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 21, 2012

      And then went straight to the vomitorium?

      • Elatia Harris
        March 21, 2012

        So I would have thought, Jonell. But I learned that servants circulated with special basins, and a point of etiquette was how neatly a diner could disgorge the surfeit into the basin, without breaking rhythm, conversationally or being otherwise obtrusive

  • Elatia Harris
    March 21, 2012

    Good one, Simon! But I’m dieting…

  • natasha
    March 21, 2012

    it is the first photo in the slide show, would i be able to contact you personally? or the photographer?

    thanks

    natasha

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 21, 2012

      Can you please give me the URL, or failing this, the name of the photographer or exhibit? There are many slide shows.

  • natasha
    March 22, 2012

    http://www.theramblingepicure.com/archives/18622?show=slide

    its the first picture in that slideshow
    it is black and white food photography
    it is a fruit stand with “pizzo” written at top
    i think its from Rosas Musings writing. I hope that helps

    thanks so much

    Natasha

  • tarabud
    March 26, 2012

    That was delightful to read!

  • Sara{OneTribeGourmet}
    March 27, 2012

    Lovely Pâté recipe and oh my the Cava & Ginger Sangria looks so refreshing! Thank you for sharing!

  • oliveoilgarlicparsley
    March 28, 2012

    Sounds a lovely recipe – Indian cuisine is a great source of recipes for aubergines (or eggplant) in particular, and of dishes for dairy-free (though not necessarily vegetarian) diets in general.

  • Renu
    March 29, 2012

    I am glad you like the recipe. It is very simple and satisfying.

  • Elatia Harris
    April 1, 2012

    A heart-stopping photo!

  • Christina Bridge
    April 1, 2012

    Just came across this site: It’s brilliant thank you! Hope to share some gastronomic finds with you…

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 1, 2012

      Happy to meet you and so glad you like our work. Indeed, feel free to send us some of your work.

  • Jonell Galloway
    April 3, 2012

    Thanks! It was great fun and an honor.

  • Renu
    April 3, 2012

    Congratulations!

  • Renu
    April 4, 2012

    Very nice article Rosa! Loved reading it. Cooking definitely is a saving grace for many.

    • Rosa
      February 17, 2013

      Thank you, Renu!

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Amanda
    April 4, 2012

    Just love that second photo. That dynamic swirl in the top right hand corner makes the whole image come alive – so clever!

  • Elatia Harris
    April 4, 2012

    Tremendously instructive and enjoyable — many thanks.

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 4, 2012

      So glad you enjoyed the article, Elatia. I think Wilson is a real blast, and such a good writer.

    • Wilson P. Dizard III
      April 16, 2012

      Dear Elatia:

      Thanks for the attaboy!

      Questions or suggestions for future articles are welcome to wdizard@gmail.com. Look for an upcoming edition of The Quonstant Quonneisseur: Quelling Quitchen Qualamities Mail Quall, which I submitted to Jonelle this afternoon.

      We’ll be responding to one letter from a terribly sad person who needs to begin his day in a way that addresses his inconsolable grief.

      Our response highlights the now little-known career of a pioneering food journalist who used knowledge gained during his wide travels in the 1930s to collect source material for a cookbook.

      This Kentucky-bred innovator later wrote a three-times weekly column syndicated in newspapers across the USA, in the 1940s and 1950s.

      His name appears on products sold in most supermarkets in the US. But few people who purchase those items nowadays know that he ever lived.

      A second letter and response provides a surprising method for dramatically accelerating a familiar kitchen chore.

      Best, Wilson

  • dave
    April 10, 2012

    great shots enjoy the spring

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 10, 2012

      I’d call them shots for the purpose of information, no more than that. Pure documentation. Have a lovely spring!

  • Elatia Harris
    April 12, 2012

    Delightful! If I can pronounce it, I’m going to say it.

  • Luca Zanardi
    April 13, 2012

    Me , I’m just an homebread maker but with a view of baking personal and pointed to the quality. Hoping someday to be a professionist someway. Reading about the art of bread making in France, I hope to meet some good artist in bread making also here in Italy, I know that there are also here. But for the moment I have not yet met. Now I’m trying to find good ingredients for my experiments.
    As for the one made last week!
    Bread with flour of Monococco/Einkorn (Triticum Monococcum L.)
    A very teasty and rich of flouvoring bread.
    Take a look here to see the results:

    http://theimpertinent.blogspot.it/p/otzis-bread.html

    I think that also the traditional homebread baking it is evolving. What is your opinion ?

  • Phaelen
    April 13, 2012

    It’s pronounced she-mo-me-jamo. The she and me are not ee sounds, more like the e in che. The jamo is not like jam but more like a soft a in Jacques. No sounds or syllables get added emphasis in Georgian either and there are no silent letters. It’s completely phonetic in fact.

  • Diana Zahuranec
    April 14, 2012

    Haha! I experienced this one too many times during UNISG.

  • Elatia Harris
    April 15, 2012

    Totally brilliant to add Szechuan peppers — I have been trying and failing to connect that fascinating, although not exactly delicious, taste to elements that will balance it. Want to do this right now! Many thanks.

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 16, 2012

      I love Szechuan peppers. I also found a lovely Tunisian variety that is incredibly similar. I think orange and Szechuan go very well together. Glad you like it.

  • Elatia Harris
    April 20, 2012

    Alice, there is a lesson here for anyone who just paid 9 USD for a quart of Michael’s of Brooklyn Marinara Sauce, containing nothing but tomatoes, basil, oregano, garlic, salt and pepper…

  • Marge @ A Sweet and Savory Life
    April 20, 2012

    This was very helpful, thank you! I retweeted the info re #futurefoodwriting and am hoping my students in Food Writing at NYU are paying attention.

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 21, 2012

      I’m so glad you found it helpful, Marge. Thanks for your input. I’ve just published a summary of sorts on Storify, and it will soon be listed on this site. It would be great some of your students into the next chat. They could even help me choose a subject.

  • Renu
    April 20, 2012

    Well written post Rosa! There are endless possibilities to make two slices of bread exciting.

  • Amanda
    April 21, 2012

    Well done, Jonell – a mammoth effort!

  • Marge @ A Sweet and Savory Life
    April 21, 2012

    It was really interesting– thanks for organizing it.

  • Sarah
    April 23, 2012

    Thanks Jonell for organizing the talk. Although I couldn’t make it, I enjoyed reading the tweets. Many interesting comments and thoughts.

  • Renu
    April 24, 2012

    It is so true! Love it.

  • ts gordon
    April 25, 2012

    I only make one bread, but I’ve made it a thousand different ways since the late 60’s. It is called Tassajara, owing to the Tassajara Bread Book. In those days, there were gurus (hippies mind you) who taught as they traveled about. I only had that one lesson on how to turn the dough. Every flour was stone ground, the organic oats were rolled and you could get lighter molasses. ..Then, there was the period in the 80’s when they discontinued the cake yeast and nothing would really rise. –TODAY, thanks to Msr. Poujauran’s published statements, I realize I never lost the spirit, nor the refinement of taste. I realize, locally, this does carry great responsibility. I hope to ‘surprise,’ but not necessarily to ‘surpass’ the work of any truly trained boulanger. Either way, you will not find a better Avacado sandwich or Peanut butter-backing slice sold in North America.

  • ts gordon
    April 25, 2012

    I only make one bread, but I’ve made it a thousand different ways since the late 60’s. It is called Tassajara, owing to the Tassajara Bread Book. In those days, there were gurus (hippies mind you) who taught as they traveled about. I only had that one lesson on how to turn the dough. Every flour was stone ground, the organic oats were rolled and you could get lighter molasses. ..Then, there was the period in the 80’s when they discontinued the cake yeast and nothing would really rise. –TODAY, thanks to Msr. Poujauran’s published statements, I realize I never lost the spirit, nor the refinement of taste. I realize, locally, this does carry great responsibility. I hope to ‘surprise,’ but not necessarily to ‘surpass’ the work of any truly trained boulanger. Either way, you will not find a better Avacado sandwich or Peanut butter-backing slice ‘sold’ in North America.~ This is the essence of great bread!

  • Bill
    April 27, 2012

    Great, that’s all the justification I need to add more Parmigiano Reggiano to my pasta–pure umami!

  • Jamie
    April 27, 2012

    Excellent excellent recap! And inspiring! I may write a blog post about my own personal experience with food writing. Thanks so much for this!

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 28, 2012

      You’re so welcome, Jamie. Thanks for your intelligent input and insight. It was a great group of people, all sharing different kinds of knowledge about food writing and publishing. I was amazed at the turnout.

  • Sean
    May 7, 2012

    What a touching post, and uncannily timely as Mother’s Day is nigh. I didn’t realize you were from Kentucky! My husband is from Bowling Green, and his parents are now near Ft Knox.

    Sending you my thoughts.

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 3, 2012

      Thanks so much for your kind words. So yes, we have more in common than we ever thought!

  • Amanda
    May 7, 2012

    Jonell – our thoughts are with you and your mother at this special time. I wish you both peace and joy.

  • Susan
    May 8, 2012

    Jonell,
    This is one of the most beautiful tributes to a parent I have ever read. I know your mother is proud of you and treasures the time you are spending together.

  • Elatia Harris
    May 8, 2012

    Just beautiful — thank you! And thanks to your mother!

  • Leo
    May 8, 2012

    well written jo po!
    love you all missu !! xxx

  • Leonor
    May 8, 2012

    well written j po! love to all !miss you

  • Rosa
    May 8, 2012

    A poignant message and beautiful post.

    All my thoughts are with you and your mother.

    Rosa xx

  • Ed
    May 9, 2012

    At times such as this words have always failed me. Ia blessed that they did not fail you. May peace be upon both of you.

  • GragreeTreazy
    May 27, 2012

    Who and where to condense this summer on furlough, share your information.

  • Aparna
    June 4, 2012

    I am an avid food blogger, cook and writer. I would love to have an opportunity to write for The Rambling Epicure.

    Thanks
    Aparna

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 14, 2012

      Please feel free to contact me through the Contact Us button at the top right of the home page. Thanks for your interest!

  • Barbara @ Barbara Bakes
    June 6, 2012

    So many great tips we should all be using, even if you’re not eating on a budget.

  • Tony
    June 7, 2012

    J – I never knew Mama Ruth but I wish I could have; she seems to be a gifted lady. As a small boy, I vaguely remember Herman as he was the front-man at your Kingswood market. His warm and loquacious nature served him well. You are performing a noble deed in comforting your mother. I hope she continues to be at peace with the world. – T

  • Sarah Gonzales
    June 13, 2012

    dude i went through your site and you dont have a link for recipes. that sucks

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 14, 2012

      Look under eating. There are loads of recipes under the heading “Recipes.” You can also search “recipes” in the search box. They are also listed in the right-hand sidebar.

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 15, 2012

      Look under eating. There are loads of recipes under the heading “Recipes.” You can also search “recipes” in the search box. They are also listed in the right-hand sidebar.

  • dave cronen
    June 15, 2012

    Is that a BIG cheese grater or little people?

  • Elatia Harris
    June 17, 2012

    Delightful to once more have Rambling Epicure posts streaming to my home page via RSS!

  • Marianne Dubreuil
    July 2, 2012

    Linda Psillakis, your magnanimous spirit leads to so much freedom and opportunity and gets my heart beating insubordinately!
    Your photographs make our lives extraordinary.
    Thank you.

  • Marianne Dubreuil
    July 2, 2012

    Linda, your magnanimous spirit leads to so much freedom and opportunity and makes my heart beat insubordinately.
    Your photographs make our lives extraordinary. Thank you.

  • Jennifer
    July 2, 2012

    Wonderful travel through a beautiful country!

  • Glenna Tolliday
    July 2, 2012

    I love Linda Psillakis’ photo exhibit! Gorgeous! It certainly makes me ‘hungry’ for Crete!

  • Elatia Harris
    July 3, 2012

    Just beautiful, Linda!

  • Elatia Harris
    July 4, 2012

    Beautifully simple and summery! Thank you!

  • Elatia Harris
    July 8, 2012

    I misread the tag to read “Religions of France” instead of “Regions of France,” and was thinking, What a great way to classify all this stuff…

  • Elatia Harris
    July 12, 2012

    Heavens, how lovely! Will make your mint oil tonight!!! Many thanks.

    • Renu
      July 12, 2012

      Thanks Elatia! I love the combination of yogurt and mint. Hope you like it.

  • margaret christine @ notes from maggie's farm
    July 18, 2012

    I am only a tad bit envious.

    Okay, I am CRAZY envious.

    But if I can’t be there, at least I’ve enjoyed it, vicariously, through you. Thank you for sharing.

    • Jonell Galloway
      July 19, 2012

      I’m glad you appreciate the little photo show. I’ve actually done several. The best is perhaps the Bocuse market in Lyon; it’s pure decadence. Now I’m going to take a look at that mustard recipe…

  • Sawsan (Chef in disguise)
    July 19, 2012

    Paris has been on wish list of places to visit forever
    Thank you for sharing those beautiful pictures

  • Sawsan (Chef in disguise)
    July 19, 2012

    I love paris, it has been on my wish list forever!
    Thank you for sharing those beautiful pictures

    • Jonell Galloway
      July 19, 2012

      I’m so glad you enjoyed them. I’m no photographer, but it does give an idea of what it’s like to go to Paris in search food and wine. Truth is, you don’t have to search very much. It blasts out at you on every corner, in every alley, anywhere you go.

    • Jonell Galloway
      July 20, 2012

      I believe I shared the cherry lavender lemonade on The Rambling Epicure Facebook page.

  • Elatia Harris
    July 20, 2012

    Brilliant! While I see the wisdom of eating only when you are hungry, I see also that knowing hunger from all the other prompts is not easy. And I think it’s also important to eat only when you are hungry, not VERY hungry. Every time I am too busy — too busy cooking, yet! — to eat reasonably, I am struck anew by what a relief it is finally to eat. A relief, but not a pleasure. And most of what Ariane Grumbach seems to be counseling people to do is to make sure eating is pleasurable.

    Also, I don’t need to see the French to love the translation!

  • Alessio Fangano
    July 20, 2012

    Yeah! Nice to see Giulia here 😀

  • Johnny
    July 23, 2012

    What a very good idea,love the site

    • Jonell Galloway
      July 23, 2012

      We love to be appreciated for our hard work. Thank you!

  • sven
    July 23, 2012

    the garlic: you cut it, crush it, press it?

    • Jonell Galloway
      July 23, 2012

      Finely chopped, but pressed could also work. I suggest pressing it with a fork in both directions, then cutting it into small bits if necessary.

  • margaret christine @ notes from maggie's farm
    July 24, 2012

    What a pleasure to take this vicarious stroll. Bon voyage!

  • Janet
    July 24, 2012

    I love seasoned salts…. and never even thought to make my own. This is a great article with lots of helpful tips and suggestions. Thanks for much for posting!

    • Jonell Galloway
      July 26, 2012

      What a lovely blog you have! Thanks for the compliments.

    • Rosa
      July 26, 2012

      Thank you for the kind words! i’m glad you liked my article and found it helpful.

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Janet
    July 26, 2012

    Definitely want to learn to cure meats one of these days. I’ve shied away from sauerkraut but after reading your posts just may give it a try! It’s one of my favorites.

  • Tony Armes
    July 27, 2012

    I also recommend “Home Economics” by Wendell Berry. It’s a compilation of fourteen essays dealing with community, travels abroad, national economy and much more.

    • Jonell Galloway
      July 30, 2012

      Thanks, I don’t believe I’ve read that one.

  • Elatia Harris
    July 29, 2012

    Tell it, Sistah! They have no understanding of the subject at all. I have never had an excellent salad in France, no matter what I have been willing to pay for it.

  • Ruby
    July 30, 2012

    Funny – France is where I learned to love salad! But the difference may be that it wasn’t the restaurant salads, it was the homemade ones that swayed me. Growing up, our salads were always a predictable mix of tomato, lettuce and cucumber. In France, however, I learned that single-ingredient salads could be fantastic, such as just tomato, just cucumber, just lettuce or (my favourite) just grated carrots. And, going back to the restaurants, it was in a Basque restaurant in Paris (Chez Gladines) that I discovered you could put hot things like sausage, potatoes and poached eggs into a salad and make a hearty meal of it. May be the exception, but what a life-changing revelation!

    • Jonell Galloway
      July 30, 2012

      The French seem to love them. I’m spoiled living in Switzerland, becazse I get fresh wild greens straight from the mountains and I’m just can’t eat the lettuce you get in cafés in Paris anymore.

  • Elatia Harris
    July 31, 2012

    Wonderful short article on a subject one cannot have enough clarity about. Thank you!

    • Jonell Galloway
      July 31, 2012

      So true, Elatia, and important more than ever, I believe, if we are to continue eating healthy food throughout the year.

    • Diana Zahuranec
      July 31, 2012

      Thank you, Elatia! The more I read about fermentation, the more I find out. What I’m trying to do is compile some of the most useful information and reliable links as I can.

  • Janet
    August 2, 2012

    This looks delicious! Very, very pretty dish.

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 3, 2012

      Indeed it is. And aren’t the photos beautiful?

  • Elatia Harris
    August 4, 2012

    I never knew about cava — at all. Thank you!

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 7, 2012

      It can be wonderful, so I’ve dropped my preconceived notions!

  • Marisol Murano
    August 10, 2012

    This is such an impressive virtual place. I visit often, even if I don’t always leave a comment. Merci. Thank you for the quality work. Chef Marisol Murano —

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 14, 2012

      We’re so glad to be of service, Marisol. We emphasize good quality writing using local, sustainable products: real food for the whole world. Thanks for appreciating our hard work.

  • Elatia Harris
    August 13, 2012

    Swiss tomatoes! This is a new category for me, and I love it!

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 14, 2012

      Swiss tomatoes are actually excellent. We don’t have long hot summers like in the American South or California, but the tomatoes sometimes last well into October, since the climate is very mild in Geneva.

  • Elatia Harris
    August 13, 2012

    A fabulous series — put it together and sell it as an ebook right here! Many successful ebooks are nice and short and very highly focused, and this series has all the makings of one like that.

    As a professional cook and for my own life in food, I am getting more interested in food for storage — it comes with being an always more dedicated locavore. I would love to build a reliable electronic library on different types of food for storage, a library that was not just a lot of bookmarks…

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 14, 2012

      That’s a brilliant idea to turn it into an e-book. There are more and more people who are going back to the old traditions of storing food. That’s a super idea to create an e-library on the various types of food storage.

    • Diana Zahuranec
      August 14, 2012

      What a great idea for the e-book. I also like the sound of starting an e-library–perhaps not just on food storage, but other series, as well.

      • Elatia Harris
        August 14, 2012

        TRE is a great imprimatur! My take is that people read cookbooks in hard copy at bedtime, and don’t cook from them. But thy ARE beginning to take the iPad into the kitchen and cook from the screen. And they want the “All U Need to Know” approach. If you designed an interactive one with room for notes, it would encourage groups to cook together — perfect for putting up foods for storage.

        • Jonell Galloway
          August 17, 2012

          Thanks for the appreciation and suggestions, Elatia. Yes, the iPad is almost a given these days, and with Diana’s training at Slow Food, she would be the perfect candidate for doing “All You Need to Know” books. What a great idea to create interactive groups. You’re just full of great ideas.

      • Jonell Galloway
        August 17, 2012

        Yes, an e-library sounds like a grand idea. But how could we go about it?

        • Elatia Harris
          August 17, 2012

          Here’s a formula! Create a few volumes in download pdf form along with a forum site. Test the waters by creating a marketing plan that outlines the project tantalizingly and gives away a free away a free download of volume I as a gift for subscribing to the rest of the series, which would be x times a year and ongoing, your subscription allowing special subject feedback through the forum. Then, the “living book” idea — password-protected access to subsequent “chapters” created from the ideas on the forum. Campaign on Pinterest, campaign on FB, create widget for cooperating bloggers. There are niftier ways to do this, but not cheaper ways.

          • Jonell Galloway
            August 19, 2012

            Another one of your amazing talents: creative business and commerce. Thanks for all the suggestions!

  • Elatia Harris
    August 14, 2012

    What a century for food! No matter what happens, bad news or good, I always wonder what Julia would say about it before I imaginatively run it by anyone else…

    My soon-to-be husband had to spend the fall of my senior year in Europe. Aha! I thought, I’ll master the art of French cooking while he’s away! I was a teenager who had learned to cook to feed my younger siblings — my wonderful mother had other gifts. But I hadn’t tackled Julia, only watched her. I got the book and made spinach souffle with a fresh tomato coulis, boeuf bourguignon, a salad of interesting greens with a real vinaigrette, and a chocolate mousse. And then I made them again and again, until I got them right. If I were to serve that now, it would create a deeply nostalgic experience for everyone, including me. It’s no longer how people want to eat, by and large. But they remember when it was perfect…and so do I.

  • Elatia Harris
    August 17, 2012

    Wow, you make me “see it.” And I would have said Lipp didn’t travel…

  • Elatia Harris
    August 20, 2012

    Simon, I wonder if anyone reads “Venus in the Kitchen, or Love’s Cookery Book” by Norman Douglas of “South Wind” fame. A compendium of foods considered to bring about great results!

    Cannot remember where I learned this, but I believe it’s the prize-taking love food I ever read about. Pompadour would have her staff cobble up a little supper for her king, which the two of them would enjoy in her boudoir — truffled ram’s testicles.

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 20, 2012

      That would be a change from the food writing to which we’re accustomed.

  • Linda
    August 21, 2012

    Beautiful photos! Each one breathes life and tells a gorgeous story. Would love to see more!

  • Ben
    August 21, 2012

    It’s my privilege to know Linda Psillakis both as a friend and as a great artist. An eye so sensitive to great beauty and soul requires a heart filled with great love. Linda, and her work, are gifts to us all.

  • Donna French Wylde
    August 21, 2012

    I feel like I am in Greece, how I want to be. These photos are absolutely breath taking.

  • Marianne Dubreuil
    August 21, 2012

    The Food Photography Exhibition by Linda Psillakis is extraordinary! Thank you for this and may we all ramble on together in an abundance of everything epicurean!

  • Lynn McIntosh
    August 21, 2012

    Linda, I am so enchanted by all of your lovely photos! Thank you for sharing your visions from this beautiful part of the world!

  • Maggie Kane
    August 21, 2012

    Linda Psillakis has beautiful and enticing photography! The photographs highlight the esquisite details of buildings, shops, marinas, communities and wonderful displays of food! Pease enjoy!

  • Betty Vázquez
    August 21, 2012

    great pictures, lots of sensibility to see with the eye, what the heart feels, a great chance to travel with her pictures. Not only the city, the people, the food, the real life.
    congratulations.

  • Betty Vázquez
    August 21, 2012

    great pictures, you capture with your camera the feeling of our hearts. traveling in tuscany with your pictures.

  • Betty Vázquez
    August 21, 2012

    great job by Linda Psillakis, her eyes captures with her camara, our feelings when we travel, seeing her work is like being in Tuscany again. congratulations.

  • Georgia Gerardis
    August 21, 2012

    The first time I saw Linda’s work I was amazed. The amazement grows every time I look at her photos. What I love is the fact that there is ‘soul’ in her work which generously allows you to get the greatest insight of her subject. I would love to see her work get what it deserves. Thank you Linda and best of luck!

  • Susan Sumner
    August 21, 2012

    Hey Linda…very nice! Thanks for all the wonderful pics you share with us

  • Georgia Goltsos
    August 21, 2012

    Beautiful work Linda!!!!!

  • Mia Blaauw
    August 22, 2012

    Love the photo’s. I really feel like I am for a few minutes in Tuscany enjoying the lovely food!!!
    Well done Linda.

  • Catherine Bedson
    August 24, 2012

    Yes I’ll say they’ll be envious of us..a sponsored event with such an amazing line up! Very exciting, big high five to the organisers who have done such an amazing job pulling the conference together.

  • Dianne Jacob
    August 27, 2012

    Jonell, thanks for helping to spread the word. I’m so looking forward to meeting you in Adelaide.

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 27, 2012

      Unfortunately, I won’t be in Adelaide, but the writer Amanda McInerny is the organizer of the conference. Another time?

  • Elatia Harris
    August 27, 2012

    Best ever tomato observation! Thanks!

  • Diana Zahuranec
    August 28, 2012

    I’ve always loved chai tea and have wanted to make my own. Very interesting and simple article, and now I know how to make it! I esp. like the quote at the end.

  • Ben
    September 3, 2012

    Linda’s work continues to showcase her keen eye for beauty, and her great skills at sharing it. May she always do so!

  • Elatia Harris
    September 4, 2012

    God what a beautiful post! Seriously uplifting…

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 5, 2012

      I love your appreciation. Thanks so much for your uplifting comments!

  • Juana
    September 9, 2012

    Greetings from Colorado! I’m bored to tears at work so I decided to check out your site on my iphone during lunch break. I really like the knowledge you present here and can’t wait to take a look when I get home.
    I’m surprised at how quick your blog loaded on my phone .. I’m not even using WIFI, just
    3G .. Anyhow, superb site!

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 10, 2012

      Thanks, Juana! We work very hard to offer work with a vision.

  • nora collins
    September 10, 2012

    Looks like we’re moving to Switzerland from southern France in November of 2012 – are these teas still being held? I’d love a reason to go to Geneva at least once a month, and would like to re-start my writing…

    Nora

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 11, 2012

      Yes, they are, Nora. It’s a long-standing Geneva tradition.

  • Kit
    September 11, 2012

    Hi Jonell,

    Thanks for posting this – I never realised that was what the Pro Montagna label meant!

    I was also wondering if I could ask a question. This is only tangentially connected, but I was wondering – do you know what breed of cow is used in dairy production in Switzerland? A friend of mine is coming to visit soon, and she is trying to eat more mindfully. She will only drink milk from Jersey cows, as it is meant to be more compatible with human digestion.

    Now I’m wondering if you think this Pro Montagna milk might fit the bill?

    Thanks for the great blog, it’s been very interesting reading!
    K

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 11, 2012

      I think that would take quite a lot of research, but I’ll see what I can do. I’ve also heard that Jersey cows are best, but this being said, in Switzerland, there is good local milk to be had in almost any village. You usually buy it at the “crèmerie”.

      • Kit
        September 16, 2012

        Thanks Jonell!

        I think, yes, I may have to go direct to the source. Maybe if I can see some photos of Jersey cows and match them up to the cows on the Swiss hillsides… 🙂

  • FP
    September 11, 2012

    Hunting truffles with pigs is prohibited in Italy since 1985!
    But wild boars doesn’t know it 😉

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 12, 2012

      I believe it’s still called a hog when it’s a wild boar, but thanks for the info.

  • margaret christine @ notes from maggie's farm
    September 12, 2012

    Truly a challenge to which I need to rise, thank you for the motivation!

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 17, 2012

      You’re so welcome, Maggie. You motivate me to do good work too.

  • Elatia Harris
    September 15, 2012

    A magnificent and learned post — thank you!

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 17, 2012

      Alice is a wonderful and thoughtful writer who does her research well. Thanks for appreciating her, Elatia.

  • Melanie Neichin
    September 21, 2012

    I love this recipe. I love all of Rosa’s recipes and her blog too. I will make this simple and devine dessert. Thanks for sharing Rosa.

    • Jonell Galloway
      September 21, 2012

      Thanks for visiting, Melanie!

    • Rosa
      September 23, 2012

      Thank you so much, Melanie!

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Karin@yumandmore
    September 23, 2012

    nice post Rosa! my word are you resourceful and a good example!
    glad you have new equipment and are now “whole” again.
    xox Karin

    • Rosa
      October 1, 2012

      Thank you, Karin! 🙂

  • vianney
    September 26, 2012

    Leave it to Rosa to create such beauty without an oven~ she is truly a rock star in the kitchn!!

    • Rosa
      October 1, 2012

      Thank you, Vianney! 😉

  • vianney
    September 26, 2012

    Leave it Rosa to create such beauty without an oven~ she is truly a rock star in the kitchen!!

  • Elatia Harris
    October 2, 2012

    Oh God what food porn. Is variete precoce the same as a new potato? I read that potatoes have quercetin, if anyone is fence-sitting about them…

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 2, 2012

      I certainly never thought of it as food porn, but perhaps it is. Is quercetin an aphrodisiac? Heaven forbid.

  • Elatia Harris
    October 2, 2012

    Good one! Unless you are dining among serious gastronomes, who want to talk about what they eat as they eat it, I agree it’s best not to knock ’em down with what you’ve cooked. I once had a guest who burst into tears at a party for 10 that I’d cooked for; she had one bite and broke down. “It’s the best thing I’ve ever had,” she said, looking deeply pained. “And I cannot imagine I’ll ever get it again.”

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 2, 2012

      Yes, I try and restrict my all-food conversations to dinners full of people like you!

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 8, 2012

      What a wonderful anecdote!

  • Elatia Harris
    October 16, 2012

    WHAT beautiful paintings of peppers…

  • Allison Carver
    October 18, 2012

    Hello Rosa,

    I love this blog posting, and I am so happy I found it. thank you for posting it. I totally agree with what you wrote about cooking being therapeutic. I too believe that the process of cooking is relaxing, promotes growth, and self esteem! I’m a therapist in Richmond, Va. and I own a business called A Taste of Therapy, which practices this exact idea. Cooking as therapy. I just wanted to share this with you as we are like minded! http://www.atasteoftherapy.com

    Have a great day!

    Thanks again,
    Allison

    • Rosa
      February 17, 2013

      Hello allison,

      Thank you for your comment and kind words. I’m glad you like this article.

      Indeed, cooking therapy can be very helpful to many people as it is such a de-stressing and mind-freeing activity.

      Your workshops sound very interesting. A great project!

      Have a wonderful day!

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • Anne
    October 26, 2012

    Sounds like a fun book! I’ve just started getting my toddler involved in the kitchen and he also loves if I make his food fun. I have some healthier fun Halloween meals on my blog 🙂

    • Jonell Galloway
      October 30, 2012

      That’s a great way to get your children interested in eating healthy. Bravo for you!

  • Liz @ The Lemon Bowl
    November 5, 2012

    Beautiful recipe – perfect for Winter.

    • Rosa
      November 11, 2012

      Thank you, Liz! I’m glad you like it.

      Cheers,

      Rosa

  • belviq online
    November 10, 2012

    better known by his pen-name Curnonsky, and dubbed the Prince of Gastronomy, was the most celebrated writer on gastronomy in France in the 20th century.

  • Paddy Waller
    November 13, 2012

    Great piece and common sense advice. Living in Spain we also do alot of gathering of wild products like asparragus, mushrooms, figs, wild plants, and sloes.

    • Jonell Galloway
      November 14, 2012

      Thanks for your comment, Paddy. I’ll have to take a look at your video!

  • Elatia Harris
    November 14, 2012

    Superbly instructive. Thanks!

  • Vente vin languedoc
    November 16, 2012

    Hello, can have the address to buy Food Wine Rome (Terroir Guides) by David Downie and Alison Harris?

  • Vente vin languedoc
    November 16, 2012

    Commentaire de parrainer Bord Bia ?

    • Jonell Galloway
      November 19, 2012

      I’m sorry, I don’t quite understand the question.

  • Kerrie Barker
    November 17, 2012

    Great article, thanks Amanda.

  • Marisol Murano
    November 28, 2012

    Dear Jonell:
    It is an honor to be part of your wonderful blog. Happy Holidays to everyone at The Rambling Epicure!
    Warmest Wishes,
    Marisol —

  • Sally - My Custard Pie
    November 29, 2012

    And don’t forget the milk puddings of Arabia – Umm Ali (literally Mother of Ali) for instance.

    • Jonell Galloway
      December 5, 2012

      What a lovely post it is too! Perhaps we could repost it as a guest post, Sally.

  • Tanglaw
    November 29, 2012

    This is very clever.

  • Elatia Harris
    December 17, 2012

    Beautiful! I adore them and I admit it’s hard to make them look as good as they taste, for the camera anyway. Thank you!

    • Renu
      January 12, 2013

      Thanks Elatia! Glad you liked the pictures.

  • Elatia Harris
    December 19, 2012

    Great find, Leonor! And what a fabulous resource you are. Looking forward to more…

    • Leonor White
      December 20, 2012

      Thanks! Glad you liked it! More to come next week.

  • Lucia Salaverri
    December 19, 2012

    So helpful leo!! Lobe youuu

  • leonor
    December 20, 2012

    Thanks guys!more to come!

  • Jonell Galloway
    December 20, 2012

    I’m so excited about having a new New York correspondent with an extensive food background, a bargain-hunter for restaurants and all the best things to be had in New York!

  • Peter
    December 20, 2012

    Really good to have someone in the Big Apple who knows her way around and has acute taste buds! Looking forward to more postings from this rising young star of food journalism!

  • Meeta
    December 21, 2012

    Thank you for your support J! Makes also a great Valentine’s pressie ;o)

  • Elatia Harris
    December 23, 2012

    I’ve been keeping my own list — what about TRE? I am very happy with the clear winner, Ottolenghi, but have not yet gotten with the good folks at Canal House — and not for lack of interest. Claudia Roden grabs me any time. I think Diane Morgan’s book, Roots, is more special than its rank here. Wouldn’t it be fab to have time for them all?

    • Jonell Galloway
      December 23, 2012

      Indeed it would. I have been making my own list in my head, but I’ve not had time to write it up. Would you like to make one?

  • Vijitha Shyam
    January 9, 2013

    Sounds like an interesting recipe. Will give it a try sometime soon.

  • Rob Stewart
    January 10, 2013

    Love this approach to brussel sprouts!

    • Renu
      January 12, 2013

      Thanks Rob! They and healthy and delicious. I love roasting them and dressing them with different flavors.

  • Rob Stewart
    January 10, 2013

    Love the light in these simple compositions.

  • Elatia Harris
    January 12, 2013

    If you are a locavore who eats foods in season only, and you live in New England, you are in for some monotony December through March. This is why I want to devote serious time this next growth season — mid-June through mid-November for us — to jarring tomatoes, making relishes and otherwise storing up the summer. Doing this right takes planning and commitment and a little creativity. I mainly shop from my farmer now — I want to eliminate that grocery store mentality where, somewhere, it’s ALWAYS berry season, and you can have them if you’ll pay for them.

    • Jonell Galloway
      January 13, 2013

      I do the same. I can hardly walk into a supermarket. My conundrum is that I live in a city, so I have no place to grow food and no place to store anything I might put up for the winter. City people have serious restrictions, unfortunately. The fortunate thing is there are so many farmers who make condiments, sauces, canned goods, etc. that they sell in the farmers market and we can stock up from them.

  • Sixtine
    January 13, 2013

    Perhaps you will think you are falling apart. Andperhaps you shall fall apart for a while. But we have an inner strength that we cannot guess we have got until it reveals itself to us. Of course some people can endure more than others. But writing this kind of journal or diary shows that you are already thinking about the illness and the cure. I have experienced another answer and I discovered that Dad shared it with Mummy when she was at her worst (let’s not think she will go back to the worst again!) but it may not be the proper place to talk of it. In a private post, perhaps…

  • Martha Beard
    January 13, 2013

    You are in my thoughts. I know how you feel. Daddy died in 2000, Jesse in 2001 at 41, and Nancy Lou in 2003 at 50. Both those sibs were younger, and Nance was my best friend for most of my life.

    • Jonell Galloway
      January 14, 2013

      Thanks for your kind words, Martha. I can’t even imagine how difficult it would be to be the only one left. My heart goes out to you.

  • Ed Black
    January 15, 2013

    We will do our best to hold you together, but failing that we will do our best to put you back together. We all fall apart. What separates one from another is what happens afterwards.

  • Elatia Harris
    January 16, 2013

    Everything is as beautiful now as it was when my mother first showed it to me. She was not at all musical but very literary and artistic — whatever I see or read, that is any good at all, will always remind me of her. Not in the sense that it was she who first told me about it — I have had many teachers since. But in the sense that I will always want to talk with her about it. When I see something really thrilling, that is just what she would have loved, I still cannot quite come to terms with her never knowing about it — never. Curiously, while this is sad, I feel sorry for people whose mothers simply came and went, and are now truly gone, even as their daughters live.

    That’s a gorgeous quilt! One of hers? I hope you have one.

    • Jonell Galloway
      January 17, 2013

      Both our mothers have left us with a a wealth of resources we can call on to meet the world and survive, and the depth and “tools” to perceive the beauty around us. That makes all the difference in a life well-lived.

  • Zev Robinson
    January 17, 2013

    If you live in a city, few foods will be truly local. Some say local means a 400 mile radius, but that seems like an easy out to me. As you say, Elatia, in Maine it means a certain monotony, in Canada where I grew up, even more so, and would mean a permanent lack of citrus foods. I get somewhat irritated when I hear locavore coming from Californians who are spoiled for choice, and those who will drink their coffee and tea nonetheless.
    Avoiding supermarkets, and supporting local farmers and local businesses in general is another matter, highly commendable, and means building a community.
    Then there’s the question of what _not_ buying local would do or does to to the economy and workers in countries dependent on coffee, banana, etc production who are the worst off to start with.

    • Jonell Galloway
      February 16, 2013

      Poignant remarks, Zev. We could start a discussion board or Twitter chat on the subject. Perhaps the three of us should do just that.

  • Ed Black
    January 18, 2013

    A thing of beauty is a joy for ever:
    Its loveliness increases; it will never
    Pass into nothingness; but still will keep
    A bower quiet for us, and a sleep
    Full of sweet dreams, and health, and quiet breathing.
    Therefore, on every morrow, are we wreathing
    A flowery band to bind us to the earth,
    Spite of despondence, of the inhuman dearth
    Of noble natures, of the gloomy days,
    Of all the unhealthy and o’er-darkened ways
    Made for our searching: yes, in spite of all,
    Some shape of beauty moves away the pall
    From our dark spirits. Such the sun, the moon,
    Trees old and young, sprouting a shady boon
    For simple sheep; and such are daffodils
    With the green world they live in; and clear rills
    That for themselves a cooling covert make
    ‘Gainst the hot season; the mid forest brake,
    Rich with a sprinkling of fair musk-rose blooms:
    And such too is the grandeur of the dooms
    We have imagined for the mighty dead;
    All lovely tales that we have heard or read:
    An endless fountain of immortal drink,
    Pouring unto us from the heaven’s brink.

    I wish I had the eloquence of Keats, but this is the best I can do. I hope it brings you the kind of comfort it has brought me over the years.

    • Jonell Galloway
      January 27, 2013

      This is so beautiful that it brings a tear to my eye. Keats always says it better than just about anyone. I’m going to read it to my mother. Be well.

  • chef
    January 22, 2013

    Heya i’m for the primary time here. I found this board and I to find It really helpful & it helped me out a lot. I am hoping to present one thing back and aid others like you aided me.

  • Jonell Galloway
    February 16, 2013

    Contact Antadis in Paris.

  • Jonell Galloway
    February 16, 2013

    Thanks for appreciating us!

  • Elatia Harris
    February 17, 2013

    Exciting to see this! Thank you!

  • Carb Back Loading
    February 18, 2013

    You ought to be a part of a contest for one of the best sites on the net. I will recommend this web site!

    • Jonell Galloway
      February 18, 2013

      Thanks so much for appreciating our hard work!

  • Elatia Harris
    February 19, 2013

    I would LOVE to really know how to do this. I was married to someone who did, and have drunk SO much great wine, but my connoisseurship never exceded understanding how to pair wine with food. It’s a whole universe, and I feel like a very challenged traveler.

  • hcg drops
    February 20, 2013

    I was pretty pleased to find this site. I wanted
    to thank you for your time for this fantastic read! I definitely liked every bit of it Very nice article I am glad I found this info on the net and I will tweet this on my social network.

  • James Flewellen
    February 21, 2013

    Hi Elatia,
    It sounds as though you’re off to a good start with the food and wine pairing. In many ways they’re quite similar with analysis of flavours, aromas and chemical structure to bring an overall harmony. Then of course, with wine there is the ‘identification’ side of things – which, happily, only improves with experience! But there are certainly places to start to narrow down the options.
    Stay tuned for some more posts on the most popular grape varieties, and feel free to get in touch if you have any particular questions.
    James

  • Elatia Harris
    February 21, 2013

    Thank you James! That’s a really helpful way to look at it. I look forward to reading more!

  • Jenn
    February 28, 2013

    I love goat cheese and avocado. I like combining them on sandwiches but this is a good idea too, especially for appetizers.

    • Simple Sustenance
      March 2, 2013

      Thanks for your comment. Avocados are abundant in California, and I keep looking for ways to use them apart from so predictable guacamole. Appetizers sound great!

  • Jonell Galloway
    March 5, 2013

    I’m so glad you appreciate our work!

  • powerballwinningnumbers.blogspot.com
    March 8, 2013

    Attractive section of content. I just stumbled upon your blog and in accession capital to claim that
    I get in fact loved account your blog posts. Anyway I’ll be subscribing in your feeds and even I fulfillment you get right of entry to persistently rapidly.

  • Oriane
    March 12, 2013

    Hello everybody

    Afternoon High Tea – sorry, but this is not historically correct for Brits.
    Afternoon Tea (or Low Tea) starts in GB at the afternoon.

    High Tea (or just “Tea”, also “Meat Tea”) starts in GB at the evening (6-7 p.m.) as an evening meal with a pot of tea und here “High” doesn`t meen “Upper” at all. This meal was early the working class meal, today you can enjoy this tradition in North of England and Scottland in a family. “High” comes meybe from “High table”, because this meal was taken at the high family table, not at the low upper class tables. The high tea food is very common food like pies, big sandwiches, roasts, tea bread, frits… nothing from the elegant menu of afternoon tea with French pastry, scones and finger sandwiches.

    But I know that in America and in the Germany some people mix afternoon with high tea or think this can be the same thing… “High” sounds better, doesn`t it?
    But Afternoon High Tea sounds like a funny contradiction.

    Oriane

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 13, 2013

      Thanks for your detailed information, Oriane. I certainly didn’t know about all the distinctions between “teas”. Don’t they call the afternoon tea at Harrod’s “high tea”?

  • Elatia Harris
    March 12, 2013

    A beautiful essay — thank you!

  • Karole Meade-King
    March 15, 2013

    Good morning,
    Do you have any idea if “KALE” is sold anywhere in and around Geneva? Certainly the Migros does not have it. Neither Co-op. Nor health food shops!
    Thanks.
    Karole

  • Karole Meade-King
    March 15, 2013

    Good morning,
    Do you know if “KALE” is sold anywhere in and around Geneva? Migros does not have it, nor Co-op.!
    Thanks, Karole

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 15, 2013

      Yes, Karole, it’s sold in the outdoor markets. In Switzerland, there are usually a few sellers who specialize in selling leafy greens. For instance, in the Boulevard Hélvétique market in Geneva, the Chapuis family always has kale. They only sell their own local products, so there wouldn’t be any quite yet, but soon I should think. Be well.

  • Camille de Fleurville
    March 15, 2013

    It reminds me of this wonderful study that was made by Ronald Blythe in “Arkenfield” – history of an English village in East-Anglia and published in 1969.
    But it is the same in France. The countryside is more and more used for extensive farming and instead of blackberrying, people buy jam pots in supermarkets (with interesting inngredients inside)…

  • Elatia Harris
    March 15, 2013

    So right! Until quite recently, luxurious dining had to take place only in a very well-appointed home. For everyone else, it was street food or a humble traiteur. The beautiful restaurant where you could be regaled with the best is a new development, historically. Remember where Lucien and friends ate in Splendeurs et miseres…? Food they could barely put a name to, in a new-fangled joint called a restaurant.

  • Jonell Galloway
    March 17, 2013

    I think it is the same in most of the developed world, Camille. After the war, it became fashionable to eat store-bought food. In the sixties, frozen food appeared on the scene, including the infamous TV dinners. After that, it’s been all downhill until recently, when some people started yearning for a connection to the land. Wendell Berry has never lost his intimacy with the land and farming. That’s why he’s our champion

  • Sandy
    March 18, 2013

    What a great review! Can’t wait to try the restaurant myself. Yum Yum:-)

  • Sandy
    March 18, 2013

    What a great review! Can’t wait to try it myself. Yum!Yum!

  • Email Console
    March 21, 2013

    I used to be recommended this website by means of my cousin.

    I am now not positive whether this submit is written by
    him as no one else know such distinctive about my trouble.
    You are wonderful! Thanks!

  • Email Console
    March 21, 2013

    Good day! I know this is kinda off topic but I was wondering which blog platform are you using
    for this website? I’m getting sick and tired of WordPress because I’ve had issues with hackers and I’m looking at alternatives for another platform. I would be great if you could point me in the direction of a good platform.

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 22, 2013

      WordPress.

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 22, 2013

      The hackers may well be from your server. We had the same problem a few months ago, and it turned out there was a worm on our host server.

  • Myrna
    March 21, 2013

    I blog quite often and I seriously appreciate your content.

    This article has really peaked my interest. I will book mark
    your website and keep checking for new information
    about once per week. I subscribed to your Feed as well.

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 22, 2013

      Thanks so much for appreciating our hard work, Myrna!

  • Jonell Galloway
    March 23, 2013

    I’m glad you appreciate our hard work! Thanks for telling us. Be well.

  • indian bhabhi, mast aunty
    March 27, 2013

    I’ve been exploring for a bit for any high quality articles or blog posts in this sort of house . Exploring in Yahoo I finally stumbled upon this website. Studying this info So i am happy to convey that I’ve an incredibly excellent uncanny feeling I discovered just what I needed. I most unquestionably will make sure to do not forget this web site and give it a glance on a relentless basis.

  • Elatia Harris
    March 30, 2013

    Totally!!!!!

    • Jonell Galloway
      March 31, 2013

      I confirm that Elatia Harris is totally FOODWIRED!

  • Elizabeth Mars
    March 30, 2013

    Sounds like something out of an episode of Portlandia.

  • Barry Kidd
    April 1, 2013

    I am by no means a great, or even good, food photographer but I like to play it it from time to time.

    When the urge strikes me My wife always ask, and with good reason, why I spend so much money on food and time preparing it just for a photo as I only do it for myself.

    Oh well, perhaps one of these days I’ll get a return but for now food photography just a hobby when the urge strikes me.

    Thank you for sharing,

    Barry

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 2, 2013

      I’m moved that you like our food photography. Meeta has been with since we founded this site 3 years ago. She is highly talented, as are the long list of other photographers we show. Good luck with your ambitions!

  • Adriana Pérez de Legaspi
    April 2, 2013

    I really have to say, that this wonderful words are from the ahuehetollis or old man wisdom on the Mexica (Aztec) tradition of educating the youngs in the rites of passage. Thanks a lot anyway for sharing with all your readers around the world.
    Nowadays we still want to recapture that old wisdom in the Pre Columbian Gastrotour in Malinalco sharing the integral vision of the Mesoamerican man.

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 2, 2013

      Thanks for sharing, Adriana. I’d certainly love to do that tour. Perhaps we should write it up here on The Rambling Epicure so that the world knows about it.

  • Ollie
    April 7, 2013

    Amazing blog! Do you have any tips and hints for aspiring writers?

    I’m hoping to start my own blog soon but I’m a little
    lost on everything. Would you advise starting with a free platform like WordPress or go
    for a paid option? There are so many options out there that I’m totally overwhelmed .. Any suggestions? Thank you!

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 9, 2013

      WordPress works beautifully, but it takes a little “apprenticeship”.

  • skip hire
    April 9, 2013

    How do you be capable of build such a excellent crowd of commenters to your web page?

  • Jonell Galloway
    April 15, 2013

    Thanks so much!

  • Elatia Harris
    April 18, 2013

    Leonor strikes again! Thank you!

    • Leonor White
      April 20, 2013

      Thanks! I’m glad you enjoyed my review. You should try the restaurant next time you’re in New York!

  • Eduardo@Andaremos
    April 20, 2013

    Good article – Thank you.
    I discovered Albariño a few years ago during my first visit to Galicia. The local people also recommended that I try Ribeiro wine. I think that it is a rare wine to find outside of Galicia and most of the production is consumed in Spain.
    I wonder if you have tried it and could give us your opinion. I found Ribeiro to be a bargain and I liked it better than Albariño.

    • James Flewellen
      April 25, 2013

      Hi Eduardo,

      Thanks for your comment. I’ve not actually tried Ribeiro wine. I think you might be right in saying that most of the consumption is in Spain. This was true of Albariño not that long ago though as well and now it has taken off hugely, in the UK market at least. Perhaps Ribeiro will be the next Galician wine to capture global attention… I’ll certainly keep an eye out for it now.

      James

  • Jennifer Jordan
    April 21, 2013

    Nice information! There is amazing about “Spanish Cava or Champagne: Both Bubbly, but Distinctly Different”. I am impressed by the quality of information on this website. There are a lot of good resources here. I am sure I will visit this place again soon. I start my internet journey with it.

    • Jonell Galloway
      April 21, 2013

      We’re so pleased that you find our information both helpful and of good quality. We do everything possible to provide verified information and good writing. Be well.

  • Tina
    April 23, 2013

    Great interview, David and Elatia! Let’s walk. And Alison’s photography is so evocative.

  • Peter
    April 23, 2013

    Fascinating interview, always enjoy David’s original insights. Having read it, I can’t say I’m planning to do the pilgrimage, but am certainly looking forward to experiencing it vicariously in David’s and Alison’s new book, which, like their other previous endeavors, promises to be a treat!

  • 5:26 PM
    April 23, 2013

    Hi, I think your site might be having browser compatibility issues.
    When I look at your blog site in Opera, it looks fine but when opening in Internet Explorer, it has some
    overlapping. I just wanted to give you a quick heads up!
    Other then that, fantastic blog!

  • TECH HOUSE
    April 23, 2013

    Very soon this web site will be famous among all blogging and site-building visitors, due to it’s pleasant articles or reviewsDownload Music To Your PSP In 4 Steps

  • Carmen R. Segnitz
    April 24, 2013

    sign me up for the newsletter

  • kredi karti taksitlendirme
    April 25, 2013

    Useful information. Lucky me I discovered your site accidentally, and I am shocked why this coincidence didn’t took place earlier! I bookmarked it.

  • Lose Weight
    April 25, 2013

    Like your site. Thank a lot for doing such a good job. I’ll definitely return again to read more and inform my friends about you.

  • unit converter area
    April 25, 2013

    Good day very nice website!! Guy .. Beautiful .. Wonderful .
    . I’ll bookmark your website and take the feeds additionally? I’m satisfied to seek out numerous
    useful info here in the publish, we need develop more strategies in this regard, thank you
    for sharing. . . . . .

  • aquarium coupons
    April 27, 2013

    Hi colleagues, its enormous post regarding educationand fully explained, keep it up all the time.

  • Jonell Galloway
    April 27, 2013

    My webmaster is in the process of doing it for The Rambling Epicure.

  • Extra Virgin Olive oil
    April 29, 2013

    extra virgin olive oil in australia,We use freshly harvested olives & sell premium quality extra virgin olive oil. You will get only fresh olive oil from us

  • Matt
    April 29, 2013

    That broccoli is having a shower!

  • hcg diet
    May 1, 2013

    Good reading. Thank a lot for doing such a good job. I will come to your site to see what’s new and inform my people about this.

  • Audrea
    May 3, 2013

    Hello! I just wanted to ask if you ever have any issues with hackers?
    My last blog (wordpress) was hacked and I ended up losing months of
    hard work due to no data backup. Do you have any solutions to stop hackers?

    • Jonell Galloway
      May 3, 2013

      Last year we had a Trojan which kept returning. We think this came from our site server.

  • Elatia Harris
    May 6, 2013

    The unvarnished truth! Lovely to have Simon back!!!

  • Elatia Harris
    May 7, 2013

    Love this one. If memory serves, this is where she segues to drying tangerine segments on a slow radiator….

  • diet pills that work fast for women
    May 8, 2013

    I have faith that is amongst the most essential data in my situation. And i’m pleased looking at your own document. Nonetheless would you like to comments in number of typical difficulties, Your website design is perfect, the particular content is absolutely terrific : Deb. Good approach, many thanks

  • Elatia Harris
    May 10, 2013

    Gorgeous find, Simon!

    • Jonell Galloway
      May 11, 2013

      Simon de Swaan does dig up some interesting info from his collection of 800 cookbooks!
      Do21zxeiPXVVDOikFsPvJshhmNc

  • Thomas Needham
    May 16, 2013

    Hello Ms. Galloway,

    Thank you for your kind comments on my art. I’ve have looked at your web site and give you permission to use my painting “Breaking Bread”. Also, thank you for providing your viewers a link to my web site. Just wondering, how did you come across my painting?

    Good Luck and Cheers,
    Thomas Needham

  • bee
    May 26, 2013

    but how do i find the actual recipe with amounts?

    • Jonell Galloway
      May 26, 2013

      Start by clicking on the title, and opening the article. tThen if you look under the photo, you’ll see “Click Small-Batch Pulled Pork to watch it.” That should take you straight to the recipe.

  • Elatia Harris
    May 30, 2013

    I installed webbing straps inside the fridge, and tie them with Windsor knots — this NEVER happens to me.

  • Tania
    May 30, 2013

    E’ stato grosso furto di tempo, ed anche con scasso ! Ma ne’ e’ valsa la pena ! 😀

  • Brandt Bolding
    May 31, 2013

    Was this article sourced from Barbara Wells Sarudy’s blog “It’s About Time”? Curious, I didn’t see her name mentioned…

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 1, 2013

      If you click on the links, you’ll find the sources.

    • Lily White Flour 5608
      September 16, 2013

      I’m sorry, but I don’t know this blog!

  • Lilopiedrahita@gmail.com
    May 31, 2013

    Im here! Wait for the Best news

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 1, 2013

      Thank you! After reading the requirements, please click the Contact Us button and send us your info.

  • Katerina
    May 31, 2013

    Jonnel, what exciting news! I would love to join the team. I live in Austria, come from Macedonia, and could always contribute on food on the region (Central and South-Eastern Europe). Looking forward to hearing from you.

    Katerina

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 1, 2013

      Thank you! After reading the requirements, please click the Contact Us button and send us your info, Katerina.

  • Elatia Harris
    June 1, 2013

    Wonderful post! I literally see Poilane bread fresh 2 x weekly, across the street from myself at Formaggio in Cambridge.

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 1, 2013

      Poilâne is certainly a reference in “real bread.” Thanks for appreciating us, Elatia!

  • Rob Stewart
    June 4, 2013

    Great article Jonell!

  • Jonell Galloway
    June 5, 2013

    I’m so glad you enjoyed it, Rob!

  • David Aplin
    June 5, 2013

    Hello, I read and enjoyed your “letter from Vienna” hoping to someday visit there. I particularly enjoyed your musings about Sacher Torte as it reminded me of my own baking apprenticeship which took place many years ago. I attended a community college here in my hometown of Toronto but I was lucky enough to be taught, instructed and mentored by some very capable teachers. There were two gentlemen, one from Berlin the other from Vienna, they both had long careers in the hotel business and were top notch pastry chefs. Highly disciplined in the teutonic manner, you had to be sharp and focussed in the baking lab or they would let you have it, in front of your classmates. I recall learning how to make the famous Sacher Torte, it’s simplicity and reliance on only a few top quality ingredients. I reproduced the Sacher Torte many times after that but only at home, never in a professional setting. I recently opened my own shop after years of working in a supermarket bakeshop. Your article has inspired me to create this cake for my clientele.
    Thank you!
    Kindest regards,
    David Aplin

    • Rosa
      June 6, 2013

      Dear David,

      Thank you for your comment.

      I am deeply honored to hear that my article has inspired you. Your clientele will surely be delighted to find that wonderful speciality in their favorite bakery.

      Best regards,

      Rosa

  • Elatia Harris
    June 9, 2013

    I lunched next to the table of the Paris local once. A most luxurious restaurant of the day called Laurent. In those years they had a little table decoration, with a flag, to demarcate them: Societe Prosper Montagne pour la sauvegarde de la gastronomie. They were drinking beautifully (Richebourg…) but somewhat shame-facedly chowing on steak-frites. I expect that was short rations for dieters…

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 9, 2013

      Oh my, steack-frites! Perhaps they’re more gourmands than gourmets?

  • Betty Ann @Mango_Queen
    June 10, 2013

    I love mangoes and just love this milkshake. It reminds me of my dad, he used to make this often for us when we were growing up. But I don’t think he added cardamom, which I think gives it an interesting twist. Thanks for sharing this recipe!

  • http://www.thatsmelbourne.net.au/wiki/WendiunLunsfordhd
    June 12, 2013

    Hello, I read your blogs daily. Your writing style is awesome, keep
    it up!

  • Elatia Harris
    June 12, 2013

    Thank you Laura! Never knew about Hannah Glasse — what a great story.

  • Elatia Harris
    June 13, 2013

    Shared this with my part-Swiss nieces, excellent cooks both!

  • matcha green tea
    June 23, 2013

    Really great post. I was never idea that food can be an art. I am very interested on this.

  • Jonell Galloway
    June 26, 2013

    Please contact us via the Contact Us button at the top right of the home page of our site. Thanks for contacting us.

  • Elatia Harris
    June 27, 2013

    Gorgeous!

    • Jonell Galloway
      June 28, 2013

      Thanks. That means a lot coming from you!

  • What Red Wine
    June 29, 2013

    I truly love your blog.. Very nice colors & theme. Did you develop this amazing site yourself?
    Please reply back as I’m looking to create my own personal website and want to know where you got this from or exactly what the theme is called. Many thanks!

  • Renu
    June 30, 2013

    Mangoes are such a wonderful choice for sweet cravings without the addition of extra sugar. I enjoy mango shake a lot specially when they are in season and full of flavor and natural sweetness. Give it a try. Hope you like it.

  • Renu
    June 30, 2013

    Thanks Betty Ann. It’s amazing how food connects us on a deeper level than just feeding our bodies. I too have a lot of childhood memories associated with enjoying mangoes in summer with my family. Cardamom is my twist to this shake. I think it complements the fruit.

    Take care.

  • Sarah Walton
    July 9, 2013

    Love Loire Cab Franc, but see it so rarely see it here in Dubai. Are you doing any more wine sessions in France over Summer, or just in September?

    • Lily White Flour 5608
      September 16, 2013

      We will be doing a whole series in France next year. Shall I keep you posted?

  • Jaime
    July 9, 2013

    Excelente aquisição do The Rambling Epicure!

    • Betina MC
      July 10, 2013

      Gracias pelo comentário e pela visita, Caríssimo! Forte abraço, Betina

  • Elatia Harris
    July 17, 2013

    How beautiful!

  • Elatia Harris
    July 17, 2013

    Are you open to some thinking over whether extra-virgin coconut oil is desirable? In the last few years I’ve read a good deal to suggest it has a place in very healthful good eating. Also, what do you like for a reasonably priced neutral tasting oil? If organic, I like grape seed oil. Ditto safflower oil. Canola oil used to be fine but I feel it’s a GMO opportunity now.

  • Jonell Galloway
    July 17, 2013

    Elatia, I am certainly open to some thinking, but don’t really know enough about it to speak intelligently. I’d have to do some research. In terms of neutral oils, the flashpoint is also very important; that, I do know.

  • Elatia Harris
    July 17, 2013

    Grapeseed oil has a very high flash point — I love it for that. Otherwise it has no benefits to confer. I am worried now about using non-organic grapeseed oil — grapes get the worst pesticide treatment of all. In general I am using oils that have something to offer other than lubrication and calories. Coconut oil is great for cooking South Asian but it’s not wonderful for any kind of salad.

  • Elatia Harris
    July 19, 2013

    James, you are amazing! My favorite guru on scent and olfaction, Luca Turin, is also a biophysicist. Is this an accident???

  • John Altobello
    July 23, 2013

    Thanks, Elatia, Tremendously insightful interview with an enlightened individual.

  • Elatia Harris
    July 23, 2013

    John, how delightful to see you here! You will love the book.

  • Harry Z Coren MD
    July 23, 2013

    Although I’ve enjoyed eating various types of food, I never gave much thought to the history and derivation of the preparations. Your interview has opened up further avenues of thought. Thanks for the information.

    • Elatia Harris
      July 23, 2013

      Thank you for reading, Dr. Coren. As you can see, so much of food history is about power relations — it’s rather psychoanalytic!

  • kate
    July 23, 2013

    Wow, fabulous interview, fascinating. I can’t wait to read the book. Thank you Elatia. I like thinking about cooking in terms of problem-solving too. I always enjoy reading your interviews, you ask the most insightful questions, elicit such thoughtful responses.

    • Elatia Harris
      July 23, 2013

      Thank you Kate! I am delighted to be writing for The Rambling Epicure. The editor, Jonell Galloway, regularly posts food art — look for us here if you ever do any. I know you will enjoy this book.

  • Carla @ Gluten Free Recipe Box
    July 23, 2013

    Great article! While San-J tamari sauce used to be labeled “Wheat Free,” it is now labeled “Gluten Free” as of about 3 years ago. Just thought those new to diet would like to know this as it is makes a great soy sauce.

  • Sally Reed
    July 24, 2013

    Fascinating interview. Wonderful ease and confidence. I have preordered the book, but now it seems like an awfully long time to wait before reading it.

    • Elatia Harris
      July 24, 2013

      It IS a long time to wait! Meanwhile I know you would enjoy Rachel’s blog, Sally — linked at the end of the article above.

  • Elatia Harris
    July 24, 2013

    Gareth what a marvelous article! Thank you…

  • Harriet
    July 24, 2013

    I loved the phrase “kitchen at the center of history”, perhaps the end of the reign of the Big Mac is nigh. Great read as always, Elatia, and Rachel’s book sounds very interesting.

    • Elatia Harris
      July 24, 2013

      Thank you Harriet. One reason Rachel’s book will be a big hit is that she writes so well that it will be fun to read. Delighted you found your way to TRE.

  • Elatia Harris
    July 25, 2013

    Back in the old days when vinegar would not actually have traveled from one region of Italy to another, without a special order type of arrangement, I introduced an august Florentine to balsamic vinegar. He was up in years, the usual vinegars were affecting him badly. He found balsamic vinegar a miracle — molto digestimolo! Thank you for a wonderful article, Gareth.

  • Elatia Harris
    July 25, 2013

    Gosh how fabulous — you make a girl long to be Swiss!!!

  • Jonell Galloway
    July 26, 2013

    I’m glad you’re impressed, Elatia. I think their efforts are noble.

  • Elatia Harris
    July 27, 2013

    A wonderful series, James. I want it to be a movie!!! Perhaps someone with a video camera will document the upcoming apotheosis of degustation at Chartres.

  • James Flewellen
    July 29, 2013

    Why thank you Elatia! Hmm, perhaps the biophysicist connection is taking the reductive physicist approach and applying it to something inherently complex in order to try to understand it…

  • Jovina Coughlin
    July 31, 2013

    Thank you for the link to my blog. I enjoyed reading your post.

    • Jonell Galloway
      July 31, 2013

      You are so welcome, Jovina! Your blog is lovely.

  • Heddi
    August 3, 2013

    Jonell, I’ve been on vacation and am just seeing your post about my blog. Thank you so much! I’m a big fan of Rambling Epicure. You’ve been a great source for Swiss recipes that I can safely adapt for my son! 🙂 Look forward to keeping up with your good work. Many thanks, Heddi

    • Jonell Galloway
      August 3, 2013

      I just discovered your site and thought it was important to document it. Swiss food bloggers don’t have enough contact, and I think it’s a shame. It’s with great pleasure that I discovered your important work. Jonell

  • Elatia Harris
    August 12, 2013

    What an illuminating series — many thanks!

  • Elatia Harris
    August 19, 2013

    Fantastically interesting with lots of creativity, lots of “out of the box” thinking.

    I have a question. When I traveled in Normandy many years ago, I saw many people not drinking wine at all with typical Normande cuisine. Instead they drank hard cider, even with a cheese course. I had to try it, on the grounds there was no wine produced in Normandy and yet a highly developed regional cuisine. I was surprised how agreeable the pairing. Would love you to write sometime about reasonable things to do when there IS no vin du pays!

    Many thanks…

  • James Flewellen
    August 21, 2013

    Yes I quite agree and Normandy is certainly known for its cider. The pairing of wines, and other drinks, with dishes that come from parts of the world without a local wine is something that has experienced a lot of attention over the last decade or so. The increased popularity of South Asian, Oriental and Middle Eastern dishes – to say nothing of fusion cuisine – has certainly spurred this. I think there’s too many options for definitive combinations but I’ll consider writing a post on some general principles of taste and structure and the relation between food and drink soon!

  • Diana Zahuranec
    September 10, 2013

    I wish this was closer! Apples — heritage, antique, roadside, foraged from old forgotten orchards — are my particular favorite.

  • Jonell Galloway
    September 10, 2013

    Cheseaux’s work is fascinating. He works with the botanist — a schoolmate — at the Château de Prangins, where they are reproducing the original garden of the château, which was a mixture of vegetables, fruit and flowers. Wonderful work they do.

  • Elatia Harris
    September 17, 2013

    A beautiful post! I can FEEL those epiphanial tomatoes right now…

    • Lily White Flour 5608
      September 17, 2013

      I think you’ve understood, Elatia!

  • Gary Woods
    September 18, 2013

    So, this is what enables us to know that for instance, a cracker, potato chip, or bread is stale?

    • Lily White Flour 5608
      September 20, 2013

      We have all the data for “how it should be” stored in our brain, so we expect potato chips to be crunchy.

  • Diana Zahuranec
    September 20, 2013

    Imagine a soggy potato chip. Even if it tasted the same, it wouldn’t be nearly as good!
    I recently read that even a sixth taste might have been discovered: the ability to taste calcium http://www.livescience.com/5059-sixth-taste-discovered-calcium.html

    • Lily White Flour 5608
      September 20, 2013

      I’ve also read that, Diana. Some scientists think there are even more. I have difficulty imagining the taste of calcium however.

  • Kate Vrijmoet
    September 25, 2013

    A thought-provoking resource that, I suspect, will be referenced for a long time coming. Thank you!

  • Randolyn Zinn
    September 25, 2013

    How great to discover this site through the work of the talented Elatia Harris. This piece is, first of all, beautiful to look at. And informative in ways that only Ms. Harris can bring to the subject with her deep resources as a visual artist. As a wordsmith, I especially like her alluring phrase “….history’s most ardent kiss—language that we can read.” History, that bloody misunderstood Caliban is rarely referred to as bestowing anything as lovely as a kiss, and I thank her for that. Another favorite: “Saffron is the dark red thread linking many ancient peoples.” Her list of sumptuous sensory treasures leading to saffron is splendid. I will be back to read more. Kudos!

  • Elatia Harris
    September 25, 2013

    Thank you, Randolyn and Kate. While you are here at TRE, please look around. The quality of the writing is very high, and the food photography is marvelous. Proud to be here!

  • chris mesarch
    September 25, 2013

    So lush, so beautiful, so interesting, so you! xxoo Chris

    • Elatia Harris
      September 26, 2013

      Aw, Chris! Many thanks. xoxoxo

  • Matt Sullivan
    September 26, 2013

    A beautiful article. What a complex and far reaching crocus. I had no idea. I love the Saffron Gatherer. Very lovely.

    • Elatia Harris
      September 26, 2013

      Matt, thanks so much for dropping by and reading!

  • Elatia Harris
    October 16, 2013

    I am finishing up Part II, and excited to be posting it soon…

  • Christophe Certain
    March 24, 2016

    test de commentaire

  • Maggie
    April 1, 2016

    Don’t forget to leave time to visit Murano and Burano. Both are well worth the time away from the crush of Venice.

  • Maggie
    July 20, 2016

    I enjoyed your review, Jonell. Makes me want to dive right into the book.

  • Cindy
    July 21, 2016

    My copy just arrived!

  • Merisi in Vienna
    June 15, 2017

    Jonell,
    you found such enchanting words, the poetry of an ardent lover, to describe your deep sentiments for the place you have chosen as your home, out of love.

  • Jonell Galloway
    May 31, 2011

    Very good idea!

  • Jonell Galloway
    October 31, 2011

    You’re right, because mindful eating leads you to be more mindful about everything you do in life. It’s a way of living, of being.

  • Jonell Galloway
    February 16, 2013

    Thanks!