Simon Says: Daily Food Quote, May 10, 2013

By Friday, May 10, 2013 Permalink 0

Simon Says: Daily Food Quote, May 10, 2013

by Simón de Swaan

A good cook is the peculiar gift of the gods. He must be a perfect creature from the brain to the palate, from the palate to the finger’s end.–Walter Savage Landor

Walter Savage Landor

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Walter Savage Landor was an English writer and poet who lived from 1775–1864. He wrote in both English and Latin, but much preferred Latin, which put him at a disadvantage in terms of readership. His best known works were the prose Imaginary Conversations, “five volumes of imaginary conversations between personalities of classical Greece and Rome: poets and authors; statesmen and women; and fortunate and unfortunate individuals” (Wikipedia), and the poem “Rose Aylmer,” but the critical acclaim he received from poets and reviewers such as John Milton, T.S. Eliot, and John Butler Yeats was not matched by public popularity.

 

 

 

Never miss a post
Name: 
Your email address:*
Please enter all required fields
Correct invalid entries

Simon Says: Daily Food Quote, September 7, 2011

By Wednesday, September 7, 2011 Permalink 0

by Simon de Swaan

It is a hard matter, my fellow citizens, to argue with the belly, since it has no ears.–Cato the Elder

Cato the Elder was a Roman statesman, referred to as “The Elder” to distinguish him from his great great grandson, Cato the Younger. Although a highly distinguished statesman, he deserves more notice as an author of the first history of Rome, written in Latin.

 

Related articles
Never miss a post
Name: 
Your email address:*
Please enter all required fields
Correct invalid entries

Sauce for Thought: Fish-flavored Funk for your Sauces – from the sunny parts of the world

By Tuesday, August 23, 2011 Permalink 0

by Alice DeLuca

In the early 1990’s we camped at Maleakahana State Park on the windward coast of Oahu Hawai’i. In the heat of the day I came upon a Hawaiian man who was busy reaching in to an ironwood tree to hang up a plastic grocery bag half-filled with something heavy, soft and squishy.  It looked like what it was, a bag of guts, and I was somewhat apprehensive. He saw me watching him and offered politely that the bag’s contents included fish guts, salt, and chilies, and that after a few days of hanging there in the sun, rotting, the liquid would be drained off to use as sauce. I must have wrinkled up my nose, because he quickly expressed his opinion that only a Hawaiian would appreciate this sauce. He was hanging the bag in the tree to protect it from animals that would eat the rotting contents, which would ruin his planned feast. I regret not speaking with him about how he would use his sauce, but that opportunity is now lost in the mists of time.

Continue Reading…

Never miss a post
Name: 
Your email address:*
Please enter all required fields
Correct invalid entries

UA-21892701-1