Food Art: Chocolate Popcorn, food photography by SandeeA

By Tuesday, August 9, 2011 Permalink 0

These photos are by SandeeA, author of the column Food Play, and who runs a site called La Receta de la Felicidad. SandeeA is never lacking ideas when it comes to playful, fun recipes. Click Scrumptious Jelly-Filled Fruits – Sandee A.’s Strawberry Bananas are a Fruity Way to Feed Friends
to find the recipe for this chocolate popcorn. It would be a great recipe to get your kids in the kitchen!

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MarketDay: Everything You Need to Know About Indian Mangoes

By Wednesday, April 27, 2011 Permalink 0

by Jonell Galloway

Indian Mangoes: Alphonso, Alphonso!

Indian mangoes are in season from March to May. They are the ugliest mangoes around, but for me, there is no question they are the best. Not surprising, since mangoes come from India in the first place. They have an almost spicy taste that nicely compliments the sweetness.

Indian mangoes may be the ugliest ones, but they are the tastiest!
Indian mangoes may be the ugliest ones, but they are the tastiest!

How to choose a mango

Indian mangoes often look bruised and half-rotten compared to other varieties when in fact they are at their very best. All you have to do is feel them to check how ripe they are. They should be slightly soft and smell full and fruity.

I buy them by the carton in Geneva’s Boulevard Helvétique market, or from Indian supermarkets. It’s all right to buy some that are not quite ripe so that you can eat them over a period of several days, or use some of them in green mango recipes. Indian mangoes ripen better off the tree than other varieties.

Mango shelf life

Mangoes keep well in the refrigerator for a week and often even two. Don’t put them in plastic. Leave them loose in the fruit bin or in the carton if you’ve bought a whole carton.

If they’re not ripe enough, put them in a paper bag and leave them at room temperature until they’re ready, just like for avocados.

India is the largest producer of mangoes in the world, with 2,143,000 hectares harvested, according to the Wikipedia. Indians eat them both ripe and green, rather like papayas, and like papayas, they contain an enzyme that aids digestion.

A single mango can contain up to 40% of the fiber you need daily, and is full of antioxidants and potassium.

How to eat a mango

Mango as a fruit on its own

The “How to Eat a Mango” section on the freshmangoes site explains step by step with illustrations for cutting and eating.

Mango as an accompaniment to a meal or a condiment

Mango chutney is good with fish, and makes a simple, healthy meal when served with Basmati rice. Green mango sauce is an easy way to liven up a piece of grilled meat or chicken. The freshmangoes site gives recipes of every imaginable type.

And of course, what is more delightful than a fresh, ripe mango to clean your palate and help you digest after a big meal.

If mangoes are your favorite fruit, and you think you can’t live without them (which is my case), Jonathan Allen’s article in the New York Times is a must.

The Buddha supposedly lived under a mango tree, and above all, this “king of fruits,” as it is often referred to, is associated with “abundance, joyousness and the carefree innocence of childhood,” says T.S. Satyan. I remember the first time I ever tasted mango juice, as they call it in India (it’s actually just puréed mango). I certainly felt enlightened!

A version of this article was originally published on GenevaLunch.

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