Unforgettable: The Bold Flavors of Paula Wolfert’s Renegade Life

By Friday, April 20, 2018 Permalink 0

TRE Book-a-Month: Unforgettable: The Bold Flavors of Paula Wolfert’s Renegade Life

NOTA: For technical reasons (I am not sure to have WiFi for the next week or so), I have moved the dates to May 10 through May 31. Do you have any particular topics you would like to bring up in the discussions?

Join us in our Facebook group The Rambling Epicure, Mastering the Art of Food Writing, from May 3 to May 17 for the TRE Book-a-Month reading, discussion and, if you like, cookalong, of a biographical cookbook about legendary food authority Paula Wolfert, which includes 50+ recipes, by Emily Keiser Thelin.

“All recipes are, in some way, an exploration of the link between food and memory. We cook the food we remember loving and, in so doing, make new connections and bonds. The amount of love, through food, Paula has given so many over the years makes this biography-cum-cookbook a truly wonderful project. — Yotam Ottolenghi

“Every serious food person knows that Paula Wolfert changed our world, but in this book we learn what a fascinating time she had while she was doing it. Part biography, part cookbook, part history, Unforgettable introduces our greatest cookbook writer to the wider audience she deserves. There has never been a book quite like this one. — Ruth Reichl

“Unforgettable is a brilliant summation of the resilience, exuberance, and expertise that we know and love of Paula Wolfert. — Mario Batali

“We’re all truly indebted to Emily Kaiser Thelin, Eric Wolfinger, Andrea Nguyen, and Toni Tajima for capturing these beautiful, inspiring, and very important memories of Paula’s life and travels. — April Bloomfield

 

“Unforgettable is the story of the exacting, passionate, genuine, driven and indefatigable Paula Wolfert, the ultimate expert on the cooking of the Mediterranean. Emily Kaiser Thelin’s well-written and poignant narrative recounts the tale of this true pioneer of American culinary history. — Jacques Pépin”
 
Excerpts from Goodreads
 

 

 
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Book Review: The Portable Feast

By Tuesday, April 26, 2016 Permalink 0

Book Review: The Portable Feast, by Jeanne Kelley

by Jonell Galloway

The Portable Feast: Creative Meals for Work and Play is the first cookbook I’ve read by Jeanne Kelley and I’m already a fan. It’s rare to find a cookbook that is both doable and in pace with the times. We all buy more pre-prepared food than we’d ideally like to. It is undoubtedly less healthy and more expensive, but in a fast-moving, do-too-much society it suits our needs. Carryout food also produces an inordinate amount of waste in terms of packaging. These recipes encourage wholesome eating for people on the go, dishes we can make ahead and take to work or school, on an airplane or a picnic, without producing waste, because Kelley also explains how we can equip our kitchens with reusable containers and gives us the names of manufacturers, making it all easy. The recipes are easy to follow and when she lists ingredients that might not be available all over the country, she takes care to suggest substitutes. This is the perfect gift for millennials or for anybody who is health-conscious, a bit taste-adventurous, and on the move. No more need to buy carryout, nor to feel guilty about not cooking. You’ll tantalize your taste buds, be healthier, and pollute less.

The Portable Feast: Creative Meals for Work and Play, cookbook by Jeanne Kelley, published by Rizzoli, April 12, 2016.

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Twitter Chat with David Downie

By Tuesday, November 24, 2015 Permalink 0

Twitter Chat with David Downie about A Passion for Paris: Romanticism and Romance in the City of Light, his latest book

To participate, go into the twitter box at the top right marked “Search Twitter.” Type in ‪#‎PassionParisTwitterChat‬. Our Twitter handles are @RamblingEpicure, @DavidDDownie or @JonellGalloway and you should find the questions and chats. Click the leftward arrow under a tweet to take part in that conversation or to ask a question. When there have been long discussions, click View Conversation under the Tweet.

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Daily Food Quotes: Farm Philosophy from Wendell Berry

By Sunday, March 24, 2013 Permalink 0

by Jonell Galloway

For 50 or 60 years, we have let ourselves believe that as long as we have money we will have food. This is a mistake. If we continue our offenses against the land and the labor by which we are fed, the food supply will decline, and we will have a problem far more complex than the failure of our paper economy. The government will bring forth no food by providing hundreds of billions of dollars to the agribusiness corporations.

Wendell Berry, “in the op-ed piece he published with his old friend and collaborator Wes Jackson, shortly after the economy crashed in the fall of 2008.” (Michael Pollan, in introduction to Wendell Berry’s Bringing it to the Table: On Farming and Food).

 

Wendell Berry speaking in Frankfort, Indiana

Wendell Berry speaking in Frankfort, Indiana

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Don’t miss this fascinating interview with David Downie about his new book “Paris, Paris: Journey into the City of Light”

By Friday, April 8, 2011 Permalink 0

by Jonell Galloway

Rambling Epicure correspondent David Downie gave a fascinating interview on Paris (Im)perfect about his new book Paris, Paris: Journey into the City of Light. A must read, that lets you get a peak preview of what’s in the book, if you haven’t already bought it.

See our article of March 31, 2011, regarding dates of book signings, radio talks, etc., and for a list of other books coming out soon.

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A culinary Trafalgar: French cuisine, a masterpiece in ruins?

By Wednesday, March 9, 2011 Permalink 0

by Jean-Philippe de Tonnac

The original French version is currently being translated into English.

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Un Trafalgar culinaire : La cuisine française, un chef d’œuvre en péril

By Friday, March 4, 2011 Permalink 0

//
par Jean-Philippe de Tonnac

Click here for English

Michael Steinberger, La cuisine française, un chef d’œuvre en péril, traduit de l’américain par Simon Duran [Au Revoir To All That, Bloomsbury, New York, 2009], Fayard, 2011.

Qui aime bien châtie bien. Prenez la France. La Fraaaaaance !, comme disait le Général. Voilà le sujet urticant par excellence. Parmi ses thuriféraires et inconditionnels, obsédés par l’idée de ce qu’est la France en essence et assez peu en actes, les étrangers qui fréquentent ce pays, qui l’adorent tout en conservant leur distance, une sorte de regard critique, ces étrangers sont souvent les plus enragés. Pour eux les Français ne sont tout simplement pas à la hauteur de leur histoire qu’ils desservent et trahissent à l’envie. La cuisine française, un chef d’œuvre en péril, le livre de Michael Steinberger, œnologue de réputation faite, chroniqueur au The New Yorker ou au The New York Times Magazine, est des plus symptomatiques de cette façon de considérer que le haut héritage qui échoit à cette France en décomposition économique et spirituelle, c’est un peu la confiture aux cochons. Vous pouvez, si vous voulez, remplacer la confiture par ce « gâteau de foies blonds » qui a fait la gloire d’Alain Chapel (« une purée de foies de poulet et de moelle de bœuf servie avec une sauce au homard et à la crème », décrit par le critique gastronomique Craig Claiborne du New York Times comme « l’une des plus grandes gloires culinaires de la génération actuelle »), c’est la même chose. La charge est peut-être salutaire puisqu’il s’agit d’essayer de mettre la gastronomie française au défi de s’égaler une fois encore. Mais elle est cruelle aussi car elle ne pardonne aucun écart, veut crever les arrogances et les baudruches qui desservent, selon l’auteur, un héritage inestimable. Steinberger est une bête qui aime, et donc une bête féroce. Comme l’empereur Commodore défiant le général Maximus dans Gladiator, il convoque les traîtres dans l’arène après leur avoir planté une dague dans le dos.

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